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Full text of "Microcosm"

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SIMMONS COLLEGE 
LIBRARY 




MICROCOSM 
1957 



IMAGES 



Our life is like sohie vast lake that is 
slowly filling with the stream of our 
years. As the waters creep surely upward 
the landmarks of the past are one by one 
submerged. But there shall always be 
memory to lift its head above the tide 
until the lake is overflowing. 



Images of time past, from the day we 
first came to the spring that was. the be- 
ginning of our years in the small world. 
Having traveled from that place, down 
the river, we stand on the shore where 
the waters meet the sea. Before us lies 
the ocean, the sun sparkling on its sur- 
face — bright with promise. 



Xom this is not the end. It is not even the 
beginning of the end. But it is, perhaps, 
the end oj the beginning. 

—W. Churchill . 



Published by the students of 

SIMMONS COLLEGE 




J4t*.*(g!ft* U)U£G£ UBRAftT 



What wisdom can you find 
that is greater than kindness. 

— Rousseau 





Mrs. William F. Chapman, Assistant to the 
President — The hand that opens the door. 




Mrs. Kimball Gonyea, Registrar — Beginning ant. 
the ending; Registration and Diploma. 

Jane E. Curtin, Acting Director of Admission — 
Keeper of the \eys. 



William E. Parly, President — Progress needs a guide. 




Eleanor Clifton, Dear) — The art of understanding. 




Richard K. Bachelder, Comptroller — Holder of 
the purse strings. 



Mrs. Harris J Bixler, Assistant to the Dean — Always time for one more 






Anna M. Hanson, Director of Placement — Our 
passport to the future. 





Emily G. Webb, Director of the Office of 
Resources — Tapping our resources. 




Kenneth R. Shaffer, Director of the Library — 
Lifeline to the library. 



Dr. Marjorie E. Readdy, Director of Health- 
Pills and sympathy. 





Mrs. Gustaf Broadcorens, Director of Publicity 
— The eyes and ears of the Simmons world. 



Bernice }. Poutas, Executive Secretary of the 

Alumnae Association — Our lin\ to past 

and future. 



Joseph G. Need ham, Vice-President — The essence 
of education is the educated man. 



You give but little when you give of your 
possessions. It is when you give of your- 
self that you truly give. 

— Gibran 



Wylie Sypher, Dean of the Graduate Division- 
The open door policy. 





Mrs. Rolf Arvidson, Adviser to the Class of 1957 — The pupil's 
choice. 



A Teacher Affects Eternity. 

It is the supreme art of the teacher to 

awaken joy in creative expression and 

knowledge. 

— Einstein 



10 




Faculty meeting — The brain trust. 





Philip M. Richardson — Science is organized 
knowledge. 




Stephen R. Deane — Rejoice with them that do 
rejoice, and weep with them that weep. 




Bruce C. Hawthorne — A single conversation is 
better than ten years study of hoo\s. 



But the most notable fart of teaching is 
the imparting of knowledge, the com- 
munication of ideas. Its ideal is to have 
two minds share a single thought. 
— Barzun, revised 




Judith Matlack^ — To teach is to create. 



Paul R. Nichols — The hand that follows 
intellect can achieve. 





Edith F. Helman — A wisdom that is charm. 




Royal M. Frye — Sage of Science. 



Far more seemly were it for thee to have 

thy study full of books than thy purse 

full of money. 

— John Lyly 




Manfred Klein — Intermingle jest with earnest. 



Margaret Rowe — She who hath good 
health is young. 





Lyle K. Bush — One picture is worth a 
thousand words. 



13 




CLASSES 

For all the school's a stage, and all the 
xvomen merely players; they have their 
exits and their entrances. And one wo- 
man, here, plays many parts, her acts 
being jour stages. First, the freshman, 
with shining morning face discovering 
the city and the school; next the sopho- 
more, sighing like furnace, with woefid 
ballad to college life. Then the junior, 
full of strange oaths and the wisdom of 
the sage. Last scene of all, that ends this 
strange eventful history, is senior year, 
great knowledge, and departure from 
the stage. 















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Freshman Reps — Margaret Powell; Barbara Hat- 
field; Gretchen Laun; Carolyn Clarfy Janet 
Whitney; Priscilla Haines; center, Sandra Mac- 
Lean. 



The Class of '60 came in like a whirl- 
wind during Orientation Week. Ac- 
quaintance dances were their debut in 
Boston and the Class got to know it- 
self at the Freshman banquet for com- 
muters and dorm students. The most 
important activity was organization — 
class officers, a faculty adviser, and a 
blue and silver raccoon to lead the way. 
Quickly they developed class spirit and 
became a part of Simmons. The Bib 
Party with the Juniors started faculty- 
student relations off with many laughs, 
and by the time blazers were ordered 
in the spring, the Class of 1960 was an 
old-timer. 



CLASS OF 1960 



A square- meal in a box lunch. 




16 




Bac\ yard breather . . . contemp. booths and college scarves. 




Freshman Class officers — Patricia 
Hippie, President; Gretchen Marsh, 
Secretary; Saundra Baker, Vice- 
President; Susan Bloom, Treasurer. 



17 




And Sophomore year meant posters and posters and posters. 



Sophomore Class officers — Patty 
Lou Ba\er, President; Joan Halpert, 
Secretary; Patricia Grant, Treasur- 
er; Mary Kerr, Vice-President. 




Taking part in Leaders' Workshop 
started the year for the Class of 1959. 
Soon one of their representatives took 
over the planning of one of the earliest 
and most popular all-college events — 
Christmas Cotillion. There were many 
other things to be done throughout the 
year: the organization of the Valentine 
Party for the freshmen, the prom, 
Sophomore Luncheon, Soph Auction, 
and May Breakfast. 

Finding skunks hard to come by, the 
class mascot was changed — rings and 
keys were ordered — hour changes were 
debated — in short, a busy, productive 
year. 



Class mascot — DEB 




CLASS OF 1959 



And Sophomore year meant s\its 
at Soph Luncheon. 




Junior Class officers — Standing: 
Eleanor Nilson, Secretary; Anita 
Oppenheim, Treasurer; Seated: 
Nancy Sandler, President; Gail 
Kyett, Vice-President. 




CLASS OF 1958 



'Here we come a wassailing . 




20 




From a man's point of view. 



The Class of 1958 started its year by 
welcoming its sister class, making them 
feel at home. Later the Junior and 
Freshman Classes were united through 
a candlelight ceremony. 

After school got underway, the Jun- 
iors took over Leaders' Workshop and 
managed skit night. At Olde English 
Dinner, Juniors served as carolers and 
provided some of the entertainment 
for the Seniors and the faculty. With 
the coming of spring came worries 
about Junior Prom and Spring Spree. 
Finally, at the last Step Sing, they cap- 
tured the steps and, in June, formed 
the traditional Daisy Chain. 



Class mascot — HEFELUMP. 




21 




CLASS OF 1957 



Smiling Seniors pre-test their caps and gowns. 




Class mascot — HEINZ. 



Heinz led the Class of 1957 in the 
first Step Sing of the year and found 
it a change to be looking down from 
the steps. The political campaign, with 
a new significance since many of us 
could vote, swept us along until the 
dragon appeared to entertain rapt 
audiences at Olde English Dinner. 

Senior-Faculty Dinner, Senior Lun- 
cheon with the presentation of roses, 
May Day Breakfast — Heinz ate and 
talked and, in the Placement Office, 
looked toward a job. Graduation was 
the climax of the year, of four years, 
and everyone celebrated during the 
festivities of Senior Week. 



22 




Senior Class officers — Standing: Bar- 
bara Buckley, Secretary; Barbara 
Miller, Vice-President; Seated: Car- 
ole faques, Treasurer; Elizabeth 
Spencer, President. 



Dear Fol\s, 

Tonight was our first Freshman activity . 








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23 




24 




ORGANIZATIONS 

Time is a sort of river of passing events, 
and strong is its current; no sooner is a 
thing brought to sight than it is swept 
by and another takes its place, and this 
too will be swept away. 

—Marcus Aurelius 

Yet it formed a pattern — the clubs, com- 
mittees — constantly growing and chang- 
ing. There was a place for each of the 



diverse interests and talents 



and we 



worked and played and directed our en- 
ergies into multiple currents. Thus was 
the running of our small society learned 
— to be used ultimately in a larger world. 



25 




Student Government Council — Front: Sandra MacLean; Virginia Wright, President; Margaret Eberlein; Second Row: 
Julia Collins; Janet Phillips; Evelyn Dowd; Mary Sughrue; Third Row: Joan Daley; Margaret Russell; Lynne Gol- 
dinger; June Gonzalez; Fourth Row: Florence Pressman; Elizabeth Ray; Fifth Row: Judith Blocl^; Jean Ann 
Schlegel; Gretchen Hanlon; Susan Parser. 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 



Acting as a connecting link between faculty, 
administration, and students, the aim of Student 
Government is to advance the educational and 
intellectual growth of the college community. It 
represents the largest possible number of the 



student body and is designed to further the in- 
terests of the entire College. The major effort 
this year was the improvement, through simpli- 
fication, of the all-college election system. 



26 



HONOR BOARD 



Working unobtrusively for the most part, Hon- 
or Board is intrinsic to the spirit of the College. 
A student-elected body, it has the responsibility 
of enforcing the principles of the Honor Sys- 
tem, educating the students to the System, and 
publicizing and adapting the System to meet 
changing needs. Honor Board facilitates livin 
at Simmons, and exemplifies it. 



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SENATE 

To investigate and recommend in any matter 
concerning the student body — this is the func- 
tion of the new Senate. Wide representation 
gives it the force of opinion throughout the 
school. Still under evaluation, Senate deals with 
such varied problems as the overcrowding of 
the lunchroom and possible installation of a 
room inspection system on campus. 




Honor Board — Harriet Farrell; Roberta -Brown; Barbara Buc\ley; 
Helen Lunger; Janet Phillips, Chairman; Joan Buckley; Sylvia Coutts; 
Constance Gray; Jesselyn Carualho. 




Senate — Standing: Nancy Glynn; Nancy Dexter; Lorraine Kechejian; Helen Klein; Marilyn Mason; Val- 
erie Wilcox; Arden Hertzog; Celeste Limoges; Seated: Robin Cram; Patricia French; Carole Jaques, Mod- 
erator; Jane Opdyc\e; Joan Winter; Barbara Buchwald. 



27 




NSA — Front: Ellen ]arvis; Carol Feacoc\; June Gonzalez, Chairman; Naomi Greenfield; 
Back: Gretchen Kimball; Amy Gordon; Marilyn Brynes; Lynette Chandler; Frances Lalli. 



NSA 



Every student at Simmons is a member of NSA, the 
National Student Organization of college govern- 
ments that works toward the progress and- improve- 
ment of student life throughout the world. Represent- 
atives from Simmons attend local, regional, and na- 
tional conferences to exchange ideas with students 
from other colleges. This year, a regional conference 
was held at Simmons. NSA is becoming more im- 
portant as the years pass and students become more 
aware of the need for better communication with all 
students on a national and international level. 



Leaders' Workshop — Seated: Ellen Jarvis; Carol Feacoc\; Fran- 
ces Lalli; Standing: Helen Klein; Gretchen Hanlon. 



LEADERS" 
WORKSHOP 

Leaders' Workshop is a Sophomore project sponsored 
by NSA. Any member of the Class may participate in 
the meetings and projects which go on throughout 
the year. It aims to acquaint the student with the 
problems of leadership and to keep student organi- 
zation a growing movement. This year's commissions 
investigated College etiquette, social activities, and 
existing traditions as a part of their project and for 
the use of the new College Handbook. 




28 



House Presidents' Council is the campus branch of 
Student Government Council and is responsible for 
the coordination of social activities, house councils 
and other campus organizations. It also acts to main- 
tain the rules covering dormitory students and serves 
as a final board of appeals. Working closely with the 
Director of Students and the Manager of Residence, 
House Presidents' Council is also in charge of plan- 
ning many of the campus traditions. 



HOUSE PRESIDENTS' COUNCIL 




House Presidents' Council — Seated: Marilyn Dolin; Shirley McNeil; Margaret Eberlein, Chairman; 
Barbara Harju; Jane Adams; Genevieve Guzi\; Standing: Sandra Holland; Barbara Linington; foan 
Brady; Ruth Angell; Patricia Keegan; Phyllis Flaherty. 



29 




Social Activities — Genevieve Guzi\, Julia Collins, Donna Howland. 



SOCIAL ACTIVITIES 



Responsible for all campus recreation, Social Activities plans and 
directs dances, parties, and door decoration, skit, nignts, teas, 
demi-tasses, and sit-down dinners. Its individual representatives 
work with their own dorms on brunches and other recreation. A 
representative on Dorm Council helps to keep it in coordination 
with the other committees on campus. 



30 




FORUM 

Forum is an all-college organi- 
zation whose purpose is the inte- 
gration and strengthening of the 
political, social, and cultural inter- 
ests of the students. Panel discus- 
sions, debates, and informal discus- 
sions are held throughout the school 
year. 



Forum — Front: Dawn Anderson, President; Heather Nason; Back: Bailey 
Haines; Patricia Rhein. 



A A 



Automatic membership in the Ath- 
letic Association opens a range of 
activities to the Simmons student — 
from tennis, swimming, and riding, 
to golf, archery, and badminton. 
High points of the year are the ski- 
ing trips, and the basketball and 
baseball competitions with the 
faculty. 




AA — Patricia Hanlon; Cherrell Cahoon; Lee Jansen, President; Eleanor 
Olson. 



31 




Lynne Goldinger, Editor-in-Chief. 




NEWS 



Enid Feldman, Emily Post, Dianne Kojman. 



NEWS requires no explanation, it is so intrinsic and 
important a part of Simmons. Every Thursday the 
circulation staff rushes copies to the crowds waiting 
in the front hall, the cafeteria, and in the dorms. A 
new six page format kept us posted on the Who? 
What? Where? When? Why? and How? of the 
College. All considered, NEWS has proved itself a 
newspaper of the students, by the students, and for 
the entire School. 



Ina Karelitz; Frances Chiabrandy; Lynne Goldinger, Editor; Fay Zerins\y; Marcia Kovara. 

I 




32 




MIC Staff — Front: Constance Costigan; Elaine Gaysunas; MIC; Helen fean Addison; Sylvia Chiesa; Marjorie Melnic\; Sarah 
Stout; Back: Roslyn Mateles; Ruth Lane; Penelope Karageorge; Mary King. 



MICROCOSM 



For everything there is a season, but there 
were times when the editors of Microcosm 
would have been hard put to say even what 
day it was. There was a season for layouts, 
for photographing, for organizing, and for 
panicking. All received full measure before 
this Yearbook saw the light of day and 
peace returned once more to the Editors' 
office. The innovation for this year's staff was 
a Student Government allocation enabling 
them to begin without bills. Inspired and 
aided by cooperative faculty members and 
willing friends, the MIC staff toiled on and 
breathed a sigh as the last deadline was safely 
passed. 




Co-editors — Risa Ric\man, Janet Shapiro. 



33 



ACADEMY 




Academy — Front: Jo-Ann Showstachj Vanli Poshyachinda; Mary Marsh; Doris Bode; Margaret Sawyer; Middle: Constance 
Pennington; Betty Hurwitz; Nancy Hodgkjns, President; Carol Peacoc\; Elizabeth Spencer; Back: Judy Berman; Marilyn 
Dolin; Sylvia Coutts; Jeannette Grise; Risa Ric\man; Margaret Eberlein; Jean Lee; Dawn Anderson. 



Academy is the academic honor society of Sim- 
mons College. The right to wear the blue and gold 
ribbon on the senior academic gown comes after a 
student has maintained a 3.2 average for 64 semes- 
ter hours. Academy sponsors a tea in the fall to 
welcome new members and an annual banquet in 
the spring. 



34 




ELLEN RICHARDS 

The Ellen Richards Club, for students 
in the School of Science, brings togeth- 
er the different branches of science. 
As members of the Inter-Collegiate 
Chemical Society, the Club meets with 
other science students and tours Bos- 
ton's places of scientific interest. 



Ellen Richards — Seated: Patricia Gallant, President; Nel- 
lie Yee; Standing: Mary Henderson; Shirley Kimber; 
Electra Yan\opoulos. 




Physical Therapy Club — Seated: Eleanor Olson; Audrey 
Haugaard, President; Mary Dreier; Standing: Sandra 
Holland; Renee Chasalow; Maureen Brodbine. 




Anne Strong — Seated: Jean Pierce; Marie A'Hearn, Presi- 
dent; Ann Coughlin; Virginia Brainard; Standing: Pa- 
tricia McGuerty; Judith Gaudrault; Martha Lyon; Patricia 
Ramsdell; Christine MacLean. 



PHYSICAL THERAPY 

The Physical Therapy Club includes 
undergraduates in physical therapy, 
and some fifth-year students. It serves 
two purposes: to acquaint each girl 
with an idea of what her profession 
entails; and to have all physical ther- 
apy students meet and share their 
common outlooks and interests. 



ANNE STRONG 

The Anne Strong Club for nursing stu- 
dents serves as the link between the 
undergraduates and the fifth-year 
nurses on affiliation. Speakers from 
local hospitals are included at the 
meetings, bringing members up-to-date 
on the latest medical techniques, and 
about the fields open to them. 



35 



HOME ECONOMICS 
CLUB 



The Home Economics Club increases knowledge 
and interest in the various fields of home eco- 
nomics and develops professional attitudes 
among students. Members often meet iointly 
with other college Home Economic Clubs and 
with home economists in various areas as speak- 
ers. In December there is a Christmas party for 
the Nickerson Home for Children. Featured 
events of the year are the baking contest held 
with the faculty, and a May banquet. 




Home Economics Club — Standing: Carol DeStejano; Joan Kenerson; Seated: Elizabeth 
Webster; Lilly Panella; Mrs. Macktorojj; Margaret Young; Ann Schmidt; Joan Walters, 
President; Christine Rush. 



PRINCE CLUB 

The Prince Club offers Juniors, Seniors, and 
graduates of the School an opportunity to learn 
about their profession on an informal level. Al- 
though their activities are restricted by a lack of 
time, the club sponsors a fall Open-House at the 
Prince School — to which the College is wel- 
comed. It serves also as a contact for all the stu- 
dents with the field of retailing and its newest 
developments. 



Prince Club — Seated: Barbara Miller, President; 
Standing: Barcy Procter; Joan-Kenney; Sara McCraw. 




36 



POLITICAL THOUGHT 
AND ACTION 

PTA stands for Political Thought and Action, and 
the purpose of the club is not only to provoke 
thought, but active political participation on the 
student level. The Young Democrats and Young 
Republicans, under PTA, did volunteer work dur- 
ing this year's national election. 



SOCIAL RELATIONS 

Social Relations is one of Simmons' most active, 
important, and worthwhile organizations. Through 
Social Relations, students go into hospitals, schools, 
settlement houses, and institutions to do volunteer 
work. They not only perform a service for the com- 
munity, but gain experience in teaching, social 
work, and community work. 




Political Thought and Action Club- 
Ruth Angell, President. 



Social Relations — Steffi Lewin; Carolyn Cohen; Constance Pennington, Chairman; Miriam Canner; Inez Kurn; Linda 
Abramson. 




37 



BLUETTES 

The Bluettes are one of our more 
popular traditions. Expanded from 
an octet to a triple quartet, the Blu- 
ettes have sung at the University of 
New Hampshire, and most of our 
College functions. Ambassadors of 
good song, their singing is widely 
known and appreciated. 




GLEE CLUB 

No college is complete without a 
Glee Club. The Christmas Concert, 
the assemblies, and Simmons Night 
at Pops add extra enjoyment to our 
davs here. This year, to clarify the 
position of the Club, it was placed 
directly under the sponsorship of the 
administration, along with all other 
music groups. 



Bluettes — Bottom: Roberta Bamjord; Anita Oppenheim; Sandra 
Bashore; Middle: Patricia Baker; Helen Lunger, header; Elizabeth 
Spencer; Top: Donna Howland; Joan Dexter; Susan Hausman. 




Glee Club — Patricia Baker; Evelyn Wolff; Nancy Garland, Presi- 
dent; Susan Davis; Frances Hardy. 



38 



MODERN DANCE CLUB 

Modem Dance Club — Meryl Gray; Leslie Mar\ensohn, President; Hermine Levin; Eleanor Clar\e. 




The Modern Dance Club stimulates student inter- 
est in the various facets of the dance. Members 
gain technical skill through the creative activity of 
the Club's programs. Although Modern Dance re- 
quires a great deal of time and work, the finished 
product presented in the spring at their annual 
program is full reward. Self expression is the main 
factor and the program is choreographed entirely 
by the members. Excerpts from the production are 
part of the Spring Spree entertainment. The Club 
also works with other clubs and associations to 
provide entertainment for many social activities 
on campus. 



39 



SOCK AND BUSKIN 



Blithely the spirit 




The name of Sock and Buskin, the Simmons 
dramatic society, is derived from the Eliza- 
bethan theater, and symbolizes comedy and 
tragedy. Anyone who is interested in any 
phase of the theater may belong. The Club 
works primarily with experimental theater 
— the plays of Saroyan, Goya, Shakespeare, 
and the Greeks. In addition to its own pro- 
ductions, it supervises class Compets, pro- 
vides scenery and props, and acts in a gen- 
eral advisory capacity to each class partici- 
pating. Members of the society paint their 
own sets, and provide their own lighting, 
props, and costumes. Visiting directors sup- 
plement and educate the members. Future 
goals include continued development of the 
experimental theater, possibly a short pre- 
Christmas production, and eventually a 
theater of its own. 



Socf^ and Buskin — Nancy Kratzsch; Maybelle Hauser; Marilyn 
Miller, President; Linda Altman. 




40 



POSTER COMMITTEE 

Since every organization may not have an artist, 
the Poster Committee is organized to publicize 
College events through a poster service available 
to any Simmons organization. The committee of 
ten to fifteen girls operates informally, on a slight- 
profit basis. 




Poster Committee — Roberta Goldberg; Nancy 
Kratzsch, Chairman. 



The Outing Club combines outdoor activities with 
friendship and fun. Skiing, hiking, cycling, sailing, 
camping; fall, winter, spring . . . the Outing Club 
has a planned program to fill any sport or season. 
Joint trips and meetings are held in cooperation 
with other college outing clubs, and a spirit of a 
common interest and experience shared makes 
these gatherings more than worthwhile. 



OUTING CLUB 




Outing Club — Seated: Barbara Richmond; Patricia French; Barbara Goodell, President; 
Carol Steele; Standing: Gayle Saunders; Carol Curry; Faith Limnc. 




Newman Club — Father McKernan; Genevieve Guzi\; Barbara Petrosal] Joyce DeSilvia, President; 
.Inn Schmidt. 




Hillel Club — Bottom: Roslyn Mateles, President; Muriel Fin\el; Top: Gail Kyett; Rose hevinson; 
Carol Korb. 



NEWMAN CLUB 



The goal of the Newman Club is to combine in- 
tellectual education with Catholic learning. As 
a member of the New England Province, Sim- 
mons Newman Club joins with Tech, Boston 
College, and Holy Cross in outings, dances, and 
religious programs. At the monthly meetings, 
members gain knowledge of the doctrines of the 
Church. Discussions of theology, philosophy, and 
the Catholic way of life are held. 

EASTERN ORTHODOX 
CLUB 

The Eastern Orthodox Club at Simmons was 
founded in 1947. Although its main emphasis 
is on religion, the Club participates actively as a 
social organization in cooperation with other 
Orthodox clubs of the Greater Boston area. An 
annual event is the Christmas party, held this 
year in conjunction with Harvard. The Ortho- 
dox Club is a member of the New England 
Federation of Orthodox Clubs, and participates 
annually in the Federation Conference. 

HILLEL 

B'nai B'rith Hillel functions to meet the cul- 
tural, religious, social and educational needs of 
the Jewish Simmons student, its purpose being 
to develop an interest in Jewish living and 
thinking. A faculty panel on the subject "Hu- 
manism in Religion" was featured this year, 
along with student panels, study groups, a 
speaker on the Near East, a music program, a 
picnic, and the annual Mother-Daughter Tea. 



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Orthodox Club — Venice Cahaly; Penelope Karageorge, 
President. 



43 




IVCF — Seated: Gail Falconer, President; Sandra Sutherland; Standing: Joan Egeris; Miriam Kent; Nora Ai\en. 



44 



IVCF 



An international organization, the Inter- 
Varsity Christian Fellowship is designed 
to bring Christian students into fellow- 
ship with other Christians through 
prayer meetings, Bible studies, and dis- 
cussion groups. Conferences are spon- 
sored by the New England Area IVCF, 
bringing many chapters together both 
intellectually and socially. 

CHRISTIAN 

SCIENCE 

The Christian Science Organization was 
founded in 1912, and is one of the oldest 
organizations of its type at Simmons and 
in the country. The Club's main activity 
is religious; weekly meetings marked by 
readings and testimonials are partici- 
pated in by all members. A speaker comes 
in the fall, and a reception is held in the 
spring in cooperation with the Mother 
Church. 

CHRISTIAN 
ASSOCIATION 

The Christian Association is part of a 
national and international movement 
that strives to unite student Christian 
associations around the world. The Club's 
goal is "worship, study, and action." 
Service projects are sponsored through- 
out the year in nearby hospitals and set- 
tlement houses. The Club contributes to 
the relief of war-ravaged countries, and 
to international student relief. 




Christian Science — At den Hertzog; Mrs. Fol/^; Geraldine Hale, President. 



Christian Association — Seated: Gretchen Kimball, President; Carolyn 
Butler; Standing: Dorothy Lu\e; Elaine Paulson. 




45 



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SPECIAL EVENTS 



Between the things that had to be done, 
and the things that should have been 
done, and the things that would have 
been done if there had been the time, 
we sandwiched the bright spots — those 
happenings that meant especially Sim- 
mons. The traditions, new and old, that 
were long anticipated; the special occa- 
sions that were over so quickly; and the 
time spent doing those important things: 
talking in the cafeteria, wandering the 
corridors keeping up on the news, and 
always, the rush to do the work that kept 
activities active. And these things were 
the spice of life. 



47 



ALL COLLEGE 
CHRISTMAS WEEKEND 




A moment to remember . . . 



Saturday swing . . . imported jazz. 




One enchanted evening . 




48 





Beauty and the 


boots. 




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Seventh inning stretch 



You and the night and the music . 



We went to the animal fair 






Campus campaigning . . . 




Olde English . . . Yes, Virginia, there IS a Santa Claus. 



Bib party . . . what's in a name? 




May Day . . .long procession and shortcake. 




50 



TRADITIONAL 

EVENTS 

Simmons is traditional, and some of our 
favorite memories stored up for the future 
are the "traditions." Soph Luncheon, May 
Day Breakfast, Olde English Dinner . . . 
just a few of the very memorable occasions 
that we shared in and that made us "be- 
long." We got together with our classmates, 
formed committees, wrote skits, made sure 
there was enough punch and that our favo- 
rite faculty members were invited. We held 
our breath till everyone came, and then had 
a wonderful time. Simmons traditions fired 
us with Simmons spirit. We had a sense of 
continuity with all those shadowy people 
who had shared in them before us, with 
those classes who would come after us. 
Simmons is tradition, the tradition of 
people, of classmates. 




Olde English . . . Ah! Ha! The dragon, he is dead. 



' 



~T' ■ ■ fie* ' ■ ■ 







May Day . . . great oa\s from little acorns grow. 



51 




SPRING SPREE- 
PARENTS WEEKEND 
TREASURE ISLAND 



Spring Spree . . . scientific auctioneering. 



And they wrote the words themselves. 




Spring Spree is one of the happiest Sim- 
mons traditions. When the snow has 
melted, and the back yard is finally 
green, the Simmons family breaks out in 
a carnival atmosphere and celebrates. 
There's a sunfilled weekend with some- 
thing for everyone; Pops night at Sim- 
mons when the Glee Club serenades par- 
ents and students . . . Treasure Island 
Day — festive booths in the back yard, 
games for little sister, "Daddy, take a 
chance," the student-faculty softball 
game . . . Pirates' Paradise Dance . . . 
And Sunday is Mother's Day Dinner. 
Spring Spree is one wonderful occasion 
when the whole Simmons family: stu- 
dents, parents, faculty, administration, 
get together in a carefree atmosphere, 
have a gala time, and discover how nice 
it is to be a part of the Simmons com- 
munity. 




Sez who? 



Avast matey's, a Spanish galleon enters the bay. 





When shadows fall 



54 





Closing time 



After-dinner music 





¥ramewor\ for the future 



The womanly art of self-defense . . . 



55 




C ANDIDS 





Majority opinion . . . 

Cafeteria caucus . . . 

House- Seniors . . . focus on Freshmen. 



Did he say he'd call back? 




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Patience and permissions. 



Add it to the collection. 



A vote of confidence. 




57 




58 




SCHOOLS 

Ideals are like stars; you will not succeed 

in touching them with your hands. But 

like the seafaring man on the desert of 

waters, you choose them as your guides, 

and following them you will reach your 

destiny. 

— Schurz 

Each of us made the choice, the start to- 
ward a profession which was our goal. 
More and more entirely we were ab- 
sorbed by one of the schools. And it 
would come to make up not only our fu- 
ture, but our past — memories of rooms, 
equipment, labs, smells, sounds, familiar 
sights. 



V. 



xa 



59 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 



The School of Business is the sym- 
bol of a modern Simmons, and the 
modern woman. Originally the 
school for girls with "flat heels and 
a purpose," now designed for the 
"girl in the gray flannel suit." The 
business student is the girl who is 
capable, attractive, who has definite 
and dynamic goals. The School of 
Business is the clickety-clack of 
typewriters, the hieroglyphics of 
shorthand, the operation of business 
machines, the theories of economics, 
the principles of advertising. The 
first law is efficiency. The School of 
Business is the door to "opportuni- 
ties unlimited," the starting point 
for girls with goals that are diverse 
and exciting; the girl with ideas, 
purpose, and ability. 



Woodrow W. Baldwin, 
Director of the School of Business. 




Advertising is friendly persuasion 
Isabella K. Coulter, 
Professor of Advertising. 




61 



The tape measure might well be the symbol 
of the School of Home Economics. The first 
inch is the first good cup of coffee — an- 
alyzed and finally brewed to perfection; 
the ability to make a kitchen produce good 
food comes at the first foot marking ; tailor- 
ing at the next; and at the end, ability to 
cook for a thousand and design clothes for 
anyone. A thoroughly scientific course, they 
are fitted for a great deal more than a com- 
petence with the vacuum cleaner in their 
own homes. Dietetics, nutrition, teaching, 
research, advertising, writing — all areas 
welcome them. Armed with a copy of Con- 
sumers' Guide and backed by their experi- 
ences in home management house and the 
nursery school on campus, they face a fu- 
ture of a thousand opportunities. And they 
are, perhaps, the only entire group at Sim- 
mons who need have no qualms about run- 
ning their own homes. 




Measure for measure . 



SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS 



Food for thought . 




62 







Margaret L. Ross, Director of the 
School of Home Economics. 



63 



SCHOOL OF LIBRARY 

SCIENCE 




The world of boo\s . . . their never-ending source of fascination. 



64 




Kenneth R. Shaffer, Director of the School of 
Library Science. 



The School of Library Scienceis like a 
long shelf of books — containing volumes 
that are fascinating, difficult, erudite, 
amusing — all of which must be cata- 
logued. From those days spent among the 
stacks with the Dewey Decimal, to the 
study of the most modern library meth- 
ods and evaluation of fine book design, 
the students labor diligently and become 
expert. One of our oldest schools in age 
and prestige, its members have only to 
step outside the front door to have their 
choice of the many jobs offered. Endless 
research amidst the reference books 
which must be absorbed in their entirety 
gives these students a range of knowledge 
that opens their field to them . . . which 
gives the last book on the shelf the tra- 
ditional happy ending. 




Mrs. Evangeline H. Morris, Director of the 
School of Nursing. 




The fifth and final year. 






Sophomore Summer 



vacation-time.' 



SCHOOL OF 

NURSING 

The School of Nursing is a hospital cor- 
ridor, with classrooms at one end and 
professional studies at the other. Between 
them lies a ward full of patients, an op- 
erating room full of fascination, a labo- 
ratory full of bottles and a utility room 
which always needs cleaning. The way 
along this corridor is not a fast push in a 
wheelchair — it is a long walk on tired 
feet with never a dull moment. After the 
sciences, psychology, liberal arts, and 
practical courses are the days of making 
beds and giving medications, and finally 
a competence in the work of the good 
nurse. Alternately with the thousands of 
nights "on call" and the mornings which 
come too soon are the antics of the class 
as one or another is momentarily over- 
come by hospital procedure but survives 
to fight with medical students another 
day. Rewarding, exhausting, rich with 
new sights and learning — these are the 
days of the Simmons nursing student. 



67 



PRINCE SCHOOL OF 
RETAILING 




World-wide tour . . . in fashion. 



68 




Donald K. Beckjey, Director of the 
Prince School of Retailing. 

Although we may know the Prince School of Retailing pri- 
marily as a fleet of taxi-cabs which bears girls toward the out- 
side world of fashion and glamour, beneath the surface lies a 
well-trained mind equipped to handle personnel problems, 
labor relations and the executive handling of sales forces. With 
a solid business backing gained in their basic professional 
courses, they tackle the complexities of finance, advertising, 
store management and market research. During their period of 
practice work, their initiation is completed. When Prince girls 
beseige the world of retailing, not only are they dressed beauti- 
fully for the fray, but they have the knowledge and experience 
required by an exacting profession. 



The executive . . . after hours . . . shown in a student-produced 
fashion show. 





1 SCHOOL OF PUBLICATION 



Raymond F. Bosworth, Director of the School of 
Publication. 



The School of Publication is the Printshop, a 
world of words and work. And she who passes 
through Pub is propelled by blood, sweat, 
tears, and Bosworth. The Pub student is inked 
up, bleary eyed, harrassed, and oddly enough, 
a very happy person. She suffers from a mal- 
ady, a disease caused by preoccupation and 
fascination with the lure of the printed word. 
The Pub School is marked by a unique "esprit 
de corps," for blood is thicker than water but 
ink is thicker than both. The Pub student is 
the frustrated or not frustrated writer, the 
woman of ideas, the future seller of truth, the 
hawker of truth in picas, truth in type, truth 
in print. The thesis-like Valz project, with the 
staggering demands it makes on all her facul- 
ties, teaches her one thing: that she has mas- 
tered her craft. The Pub School is a world 
of words, of work, of people, Ginny, Fez, Dot- 
ty, Boz; of places, the Gay room, the print- 
shop, a world quite fascinating. 



i r mm 







70 












,sm. 




. . . Friend, you stand on sacred ground 
THIS IS A PRINTING OFFICE . . . 





Dino G. Valz . . . Project! 



Donald L. Fessenden . . . All hail 
our noble friend! 



7! 




Wei don Welfling, Director of the School of 
Social Science. 



The facets of the School of Social Science 
are legion. Utterly defying classification, its 
varied job goals are in equal number to its 
members. Psychology, Economics, Sociol- 
ogy, History, are all important and a part 
of the whole. Nor does its being the school 
closest to a liberal arts education prevent it 
from having a large practical experience. 
Volunteer Work is more than a community 
service — it makes up a broad range of ex- 
perience forwarding the educational goal. 
Work done at Boston Psychopathic Hos- 
pital, Settlement House and other Boston 
institutions is worthwhile in any field grad- 
uates may ultimately choose. As a door to 
government work, community work, future 
study, and the financial and personnel 
fields, Social Science offers a choice and 
diversity of learning which makes it one of 
the most popular schools at Simmons. 



SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SCIENCE 




Cigarette breaks between classes gives rise to an impromptu seminar. 



73 



Although it is not an undergraduate school, 
the School of Social Work is well-known and 
widely respected. A two-year program for 
college graduates, it affords the student 
an opportunity to combine fundamental 
courses with field work and thus gain an 
understanding of the philosophy of social 
work and the concepts which guide the 
worker ; later, there is a chance for speciali- 
zation and continuous responsibility. To at- 
tain their Master's degree, students take 
courses which will give them insight and al- 
low increased capability in the practical 
aspects of their work. 




Robert F. Rutherford, Director o) the 
School of Social Wor\. 



SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK 




Time out between classes. 



Class hours spent in learning to serve. 




75 






SCHOOL OF 

SCIENCE 

The School of Science is a test tube, and a natural 
haven for those who find beauty in precision and 
clarity of analysis. The School of Science is the 
key to a telescopic as well as a microscopic view of 
life; she who looks through the microscope at 
minutiae glimpses the vast a nd eternal world of 
scientific structure. The science student bears the 
insignia of the lab ; occasionally she is partly blown 
up, burnt up, spotted and speckled. But the labora- 
tory is a constant challenge, a place both familiar 
and exciting. The science student is biologist, 
chemist, physicist, perfectionist bv nature and 
craft. She learns that almost-right is not enough. 
The science student lives in a world of colors, 
odors, curious formulae; a glass world whose trans- 
parency enables her to see with the eyes of the 
Curies, Einsteins, Pasteurs. Like them, the student 
seeks solutions in test tubes. 




Fire burn and cauldron bubble. 



76 





John Arrend Timm, Director of the 
School of Science. 



The greatest discoveries are yet to be made. 





78 





SENIORS 

Four years of college, four years of laugh- 
ter, trouble, happiness, and friends, four 
years of learning and growth. Gradu- 
ation, senior year, leaving Simmons; all 
are double-edged swords. The lure of the 
future, certain or uncertain; the security 
of the past, each corner traced, lived and 
remembered — familiarity traded for ad- 
venture. The years rushed by as a rapid 
river, breaking on rocks, swirling giddily, 
a sudden pool of still water. Together we 
traveled toward this point, gaining toler- 
ance and memories. We stand together 
for the last time before answering the 
alluring call of tomorrow. 




79 



s 




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ft-' 



Jane Sherman Adams 
Business 

Quick with a quip . . . sophisticated 
tomboy . . . the Scot with the Celtic 
air . . . ebullient vitality. 




Helen Jean Addison 
Publication 

Refined appearance . . . gigantic sense 
of humor . . . perfectionist with finesse 
. . . talent for repartee. 




Mary Lee Adriance 
Nursing 

Tennis racket in one hand, procedure 
manual in the other . . . clearheaded 
and practical . . . a resourceful Yankee 
humor. 



80 




Marion Sara Apter 
Science 

Impulsive fun combined with constant 
alertness . . . never discouraged . . . 
friendliness is her trademark- 



Ruth Caroline Angell 
Social Science 

A definite, deliberate, devoted Repub- 
lican . . . fastidious and business-like 
appearance . . . a lawyer of the future. 






Ena Almuly 
Social Science 

Genuine interest in any undertaking 
. . . adept bilinguist . . . trustworthy, 
the essence of sincerity . . . world 
traveler. 



Dawn Blanche Anderson 
Publication 

Pert politician . . . shyness tempered 
with vivacity . . . flashing wit and 
blond brightness are unforgettable. 



81 





Barbara August 
Social Science 

Blond brightness . . . quiet insistence 
on perfection . . . a ready word of 
encouragement. 



Clara Augusta Austin 
Retailing 

Cooperative spirit . . . subtle cynic 
. . . capacity for fun . . . future 
member of the fashion world. 






Wendy Baker 
Nursing 

Easy-going and soft-spoken . . . the 
lovely dar\ hair set off by the white 
cap . . . the spirit of charity. 



Muriel Phylis Baltimore 
Science 

Present tense: scientist; future tense: 
homema\er . . . the sympathetic lis- 
tener . . . complex of practicality and 
romance. 



82 



Phyllis Rose Bornstein 
Science 

Her smile says what words never 
could . . . not shyness, but a calm 
reserve. 



Gwendolyn June Bickford 
Science 

Calm, cool, and collected . . . her 
quic\ smile has won her many friends. 



Judith Badgers Berman 
Science 

Talent for being a friend . . . ready 
and able . . . quiet intelligence in- 
spires confidence, respect. 




Dorothy Bennett 
Social Science 

Immaculate . . . new hair style 
and a new interest every day . . . 
facile mastery of fashions. 




Mary Elizabeth Bennett 
Nursing 

Tranquil manner . . . subdued sense 
of humor even funnier on the rare 
occasions it shows up . . . lilting voice. 




83 



Nancy Elizabeth Bowker 
Nursing 

Self-contained . . . unostentatious but 
candid assuredness . . . a valuable 
colleague. 




Joan Waring Brady 
Publication 



Sophisticated mien 
and a fluent wit . 
and informality. 



. . . dreamy eyes 
. mixture of chic 




Marion Anita Brody 
Social Science 

A witticism for everything . . . or- 
ganized approach . . . everything falls 
into place systematically. 



.2 



Ronna Jo Brickman 
Business 

Ceaseless activity . . . wonderfully 
alive, she is charming in any setting. 




I 




Joan Elizabeth Buckley 
Science 

A dreamy dignity . . . conscientious yet 

capricious . 

scientist. 



our scatter-brained 




Barbara Gertrude Buckley 
Social Science 

A friendly grin and a mad dash . . . 
she's always on the go and \nows 
where she's headed. 





Renee Phyllis Bruckner 
Business 

Infectious laugh . . . mathematical pre- 
cision . . . hilarity with a straight face 
. . . time for wor\, more time for fun. 




Phyllis Isenman Buchsbaum 
Social Science 

A dancer's grace . . . smiles come 
easily . . . busy housekeeper . . . 
glowing lool^ of fresh vitality. 



85 




Judith Ann Byman 
Science 

Slender grace and a lovely smile set 
off her personality . . . quiet, but with 
dignity. 




\ 7 



Phyllis Cameron 
Nursing 

Sees the good side of people . . . whim- 
sical and intelligent . . . a recent ac- 
quisition. 



86 




Sylvia Rosita Chiesa 
Science 

Scientist with many extra talents . . . 
per\y, lively, but patient . . . the 
meaning of efficiency. 




'• \ 



Frances Ada Chiabrandy 
Business 

Rougish smile . . . the candid remar\ 
. . . refreshingly sarcastic, and sin- 
cerely good-natured. 




Emogene Ann Chase 
Social Science 

Our Northern Southern belle . . . \een 
mind . . . \md heart . . . quick 
laughter. 





Nancy Patricia Carroll 
Business 

So lovely and charming . . . a pixie 
hidden by a veil of prettmess. 



Renee Lynn Chasalow 
Science 

A scientist's absorption, with a dream- 
er's abstraction . . . pert profile . . . 
always the model's poise. 



87 








Audrey Barbara Cloper 
Business 

Ready for anything . . . calm and col- 
lected . . . emerges from every crisis 
with a smile. 




Arlene Levy Cohen 
Retailing 

Poised and personable . . . a flair 
for design . . . the busy housewife. 





1 



Julia McMahon Collins 
Home Economics 

Personality plus . . . the ability to li\e 
people . . . the fresh, bright, original 
approach. 



Ellen Elgart Conovitz 
Retailing 

Elegance of manner . . . self-assured 
. . . immediately became part of her 
adopted school. 



88 



Joan Frances Cummings 
Retailing 



Ruth Gardner Crider 
Publication 



Charm, competence, and creativeness Crisis is routine . . . nimble grace, 
. . . blend of sweetness and sophisti- animated wit . . . coffee, cigarettes, 
cation. conversation . . . skilled raconteur. 



Sylvia Allen Coutts 

Publication 

Unplanned proficiency . . . definite 
%oals and the enthusiasm to reach 
them . . . animated intensity. 





Constance Frances Costigan 
Publication 

Completely competent . . . stately 
blondness with an artist's dream . . . 
never without a drawing board or an 
idea. 



Sheila Constance Cormack 
Social Science 

Reserved and unassuming . . . 
keen-witted . . . affinity for re- 
laxation ... fluent in Spanish. 




Joan Paula Daley 
Business 

Erin's sparkle and fluidity . . . flexible 
spirit with constant efficiency . . . 
brightens the room she enters. 




Joan Louise Damon 
Nursing 

Even-tempered . . . irrepressible in- 
trinsic commedienne . . . good co- 
worker . . . unexpected buoyancy. 




Judith Sandra Davis 
Social Science 

Quiet calm . . . concentrated ability . . . 
lends an air of restfulness and confi- 
dence. 



Judith Hansis Davies 
Business 

Thoughtful and honestly nice 
successful homema\er and student 
\ittenish and glowing. 





90 




Patricia Lingley Dickson 
Retailing 

Delightful personality . . . fluctuating 
moods . . . the original spontaneous 
remar\ . . . a loyal friend. 




Carol Joan DeStefano 
Home Economics 

. In addition- to anyone ' s kitchen 
smiling eyes . . . and quiet wit 
bubbles li\e champagne. 




Priscilla Ann Davis 
Social Science 

Sincere interest in learning . . . future 




teacher . . 
realistically 
individual. 



. a 'down 
oriented . 



Mainer" 
the 



Joyce Elizabeth DeSilvia 
Science 

erious at the right moments . . . 
never without a twinkle . . . impish 
gentleness . . . air of competence. 



91 



M(|fflWW|WWBII 




■ m 



Julia Ann Dillon 
Science 

Casual exterior with a lust for adven- 
ture . . . ma\es any situation loo\ 
brighter . . . easy smile. 




Illlliill-f':; r i;: i|i| 



Marilyn Barbara Dolin 
Publication 

Sympathetic confidant . . . amazing 
energy . . , talented . . . the drug store 
is her office. 




t ■, 



Gail Elaine Dontigney 
Social Science 

Cover of Mademoiselle . . . little girl 
glamour plus the poise of the sophisti- 
cate . . . a love of love. 



92 




Yvette Marie Dowling 
Business 

Enthusiasm for any venture . . . little 
and lively . . . accepts responsibility 
graciously. 



"3* 



) 



Mary Wilma Dreier 

Science 

Delicious sense of humor . . . radiantly 
bright as a spring day . . . responsible, 
cooperative, reliable. 






Evelyn Jane Dowd 
Business 

Fresh and crisp as a tailored blouse 
. . . efficiency pleasantly balanced with 
friendly warmth and personality. 



Elizabeth Leona Duncan 
Science 

Pretty, poised and sophisticated . . . 
moves in a group, yet is noticed alone 
. . . a reserve that is never impersonal. 



93 





Sylvia Anne Dyke 
Business 

Precise endeavor . . . expert in all 
attempted . . . glad to share her talents 
. . . steady and good-natured worker. 



/ 




Margaret Davidson Eberlein 
Publication 

Competent . . . an elfish grin and 
common sense . . . hurried but 
never harried . . . wears responsi- 
bilities well. 





Jane Prentice Ettinger 
Retailing 

Elegance in dress and manner . . . 
creative talent and the willingness to 
use it for many jobs. 



Gail Enid Falconer 
Publication 

Tremendous willingness to carry out 
anything . . . could out-tal\ a North- 
easter . . . rarely stops wording. 



94 



Sylvia Ann Flight Phyllis Elaine Flaherty 

Library Science Social Science Natalie Jean Fitts 

An understanding that reaches out to Twin\ling eyes betray fun-loving Science 

everyone and a friendliness that draws thoughts . . . a sense of responsibility A sports addict . . . sparkling eyes re- 

everyone to her. and never-failing ability. veal a sharp personality. 




Enid Marilyn Feldman 
Publication 

An enthusiasm that is pleasantly 
encompassing . . . completely hap- 
py and happily complete. 




Constance Lee Fields 
Social Science 

Fascination for art . . . puts heart and 
soul into her enthusiasm . . . the pres- 
ence of a dancer. 




95 





Martha Wheatley Foster 

Business 

Willowy blond . . . head in the clouds, 
feet on the ground. 




Sandra Elaine Frank 
Social Science 

Frantic preparation for her jobs, 
always well done . . . steadily vi- 
vacious . . . inquiring student. 





Meredith Easter Frazer 
Business 

Impossible not to be cheered by her 
. . . projects completed with talented 



Virginia Kuehner Fusick 
Nursing 

From registered nurse to Mrs. to Sim- 
mons . . . on to teaching in a collegiate 
school of nursing. 



96 



Elaine Anne Gaysunas 
Business 

Eager and understanding, she maizes 
the difficult easy and the complex 
simple . . . fun-loving. 



Patricia Ann Gaughan 
Social Science 

Pleasant company in any situation . . . 
calm and dependable, always willing 
to listen and assist. 



Nancy Louise Garland 
Social Science 

Interested in people of all \inds . . . 
dual artistic ability . . . varied athletic 
interests. 





) 





Doreen Gardner 
Science 

Displaced mathematician . . . an appre- 
ciation of the comical and an under- 
standing of the serious. 



Patricia Margaret Gallant 
Science 

A whirlwind in a white coat . . 
frisky and unspoiled . . . reserve 
are lost in her liveliness. 




97 







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Lynne Janice Goldinger 
Publication 

Headlines and deadlines . . . compe- 
tent editor . . . ingenious pran\ster 
. . . rogue disguised by dignity. 



Irma Joy Goldman 
Business 

Knows what friendship means and in- 
cludes . . . welcome addition to any 
group . . . spontaneous remar\. 



98 



- 



& 



Priscilla Stephanne Greene 
Science 

Quiet-spoken scientist . . . subdued and 
genuine . . . precise and professional 
. . . hearty laughter. 




Sandra Malver Goodman 
Science 

Petite miss . . . physiology whiz . . . 
transfer student who made friends 
quickly. 







Kathleen Vetromile Gonsalves 
Library Science 

Great ability beneath a perfect com- 
posure . . . representative of the school 
. . . a perfect lady. 



June Johnston Gonzalez 
Business 

A smouldering temperament . . . vi- 
brates with intense purpose . . . blazes 
of energy . . . internationally minded. 



Barbara Letha Lois Goodell 
Business 

Lover of the outdoors ... a thinner 
. . . will write her way through life. 



99 




1111111 




Lois Rita Greenspan 
Business 

Friendship ta\en seriously . . . coffee 
is the staff of 'ife . . . the day begins 
at noon. 



Jeannette Elizabeth Grise 
Science 

Known by the length of her pony 
tail . . . scholastic prowess . . . a 
lab coat or a formal. 





Lillian Mavis Guerney 
Social Science 

A helping hand given readily . . . a 
serious smile and a twinkle in her eye. 



Emilie Anne Gustafson 
Nursing 

Ouic\ and always ready for a fo\e . . . 
the optimistic insight . . . a good co- 
worker. 



100 



Joyce Harvey 
Social Science 

Dancing through life, she never misses 
a step . . . pleasant, witty, willing to 
wor\. 



Barbara Frances Harju 
Business 

Efficiency . . . loves to tal\ at any 
hour . . . well-dressed . . . valuable 
worker. 



Louise Helena Harian 
Business 

Meticulous . . . down-to-earth . . . high 



scholastic standards 
scenes worker. 



behmd-the- 




Genevieve Mary Guzik 
Retailing 

A flair for fashion . . . campus 
activities coordinator . . . ap- 
proaches each day with impish 
intensity. 




Natalie Marianne Haddad 
Science 

Neat, petite young lady . . . dar\, 
flashing eyes, bright smile . . . charm 
of being genuine. 




101 



Audrey Nielsen Haugaard 
Science 

Poise, charm, graciousness; all the in- 
gredients of a true lady . . . calm and 
capable, conquers any situation. 




Maybelle Ann Hauser 
Business 

Wisdom behind a grin . . . Spanish 
beauty . . . sense of humor . . . she 
makes life a chuckle. 




Arden Knight Hertzog 
Home Economics 

The essence of sincerity and unassum- 
ing charm . . . a lady in the truest 
sense . . . unfailingly helpful. 




Mary Margaret Henderson 
Social Science 

Spark °f Ireland in her eyes . . . 
clothes connoisseur ... baseball scholar. 



102 




Muriel Mary Hubbard 
Nursing 

Registered nurse and then to India 
. . . now on to mental health wor\, via 
Simmons. 




Donna Howland 
Home Economics 

The humor in any situation . . . red- 
headed vitality . . . easy-going . . . 
f unloving . . . spontaneously witty. 




Nancy Ann Hodgkins 
Science 

Unassuming intelligence in every field 
. . . dignified poise and a New Eng- 
land strength. 




Muriel Cashell Holub 
Science 

Easy-going charm . . . versatility of 
the dancer and the scientist . . . capti- 
vating smile. 



103 



Lilli Svea Johanson 
Nursing 

Coed, to M.G.H. and nursing, to 
Simmons and now teaching? 




Carole Hayes Jaques 
Business 

Easy to \now and li\e . . . little girl 
with a capacity for doing big things. 





Ilene Edelstein Johnson 
Publication 

Grecian beauty . . . poise and serenity 
of an individualist . . . a quiet voice 
that warrants listening. 



104 




Lorraine Jo- An Kechejian 
Social Science 

Very lady-li\e . . . always wearing a 
smile . . . conscientious student . . . 
polished and smartly dressed. 



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Ina Lee Karelitz 

Business 

A musical whiz . . . sensible handling 
of many job's . . . satisfying to wor\ 
with . 



Sandra Patkin Karp 

Social Science 

Mature . . . quiet reserve . . . adult 
charm and youthful poignancy. 





Penelope Seveste Karageorge 
Publication 

Charm of the unpredictable . . . slow 
drawl and quic\ wit . . . Mona Lisa 
with the devil in her eye. 



105 




Elizabeth Keith 
Nursing 

Operating room nurse . . . now turned 
collegian . . . goal in sight. 




Barbara Ann Kelley 
Science 

Does whatever she sets her mind 
to ... a study in contrasts . . . 
the sprightly scientist. 





Kay Robinson Kennard 
Retailing 

Funloving yet practical . . . has a sen- 
sible approach to life. 



Joan Frances Kenney 
Retailing 

Capable . . . definite personality . . . 
indefinable style of her own . . . poised. 



106 



Elaine Krauss 
Social Science 

Volatile . , . wor\s hard and plays 
hard . . . the rare ability of having 
perspective. 



Nancy Adelaide Kratzsch 
Library Science 

Original is the word . . . the thespian 
of s\it and play . . . the wry, humor- 
ous remark^- 



Marcia Joan Kovara 
Publication 

Cute and per\y . , . writing versatility 
. . . sensibility . . . flair for the orig- 
inal. 





Shirley Anne Kimber 
Science 

Sweetness and light with depth . . . 
uncompromising determination 
that \nows when to pause. 




Mary Evelyn King 
Publication 

Stability when things go wrong . . . 
crisp hair, cool manner . . . a genius 
for inventiveness. 




107 




Rosanne Olivia Kunze 
Business 

Sincerity of purpose . . . dancer's poise 
and stately bearing . . . efficiency in 
action. 




Paula Bloomf ield Landau 
Social Science 

Conscientious hard wor\er . . . 
reassuring smile . . . willing and 
ready to be of help. 





Ruth Allen Lane 
Publication 

Wisdom with a smile . . . art of put- 
ting friends at ease . . . humor on a 
dull day. 



Judith Warren Lazzara 
Business 

Never wastes words . . . determined 
and practical . . . capacity for achieve- 
ment. 



108 



Lucinda Anne Likins 
Retailing 

An inner glow . . . an outer sparkle 
. . . easy air and a rush of vitality. 



Ruth Eva Lewis 
Nursing 

Under the serenity, a tendency to 
bubble . . . never-failing tact and 
competence . . . long-term friend. 



Virginia Audrey Levy 
Social Science 

Combination of charm and sincerity 
in a special way . . . calmness and a 
touch of intensity. 




) 






Jean Bernadette Lee 
Science 

A petite versatile miss . . . ready with 
a helping hand and a big smile. 



Elaine Anne LeBaron 

Retailing 

Briskness of outlook^ . . . assured 
manner . . . efficiency plus on 
every job. 





109 




Barbara Marr Linington 
Retailing 

Fresh and wholesome . . . the gra- 
cious personality . . . dancing feet . . . 
oriented toward fashion . . . mature 
responsible attitude. 





Barbara Frances Lloyd 
Nursing 

Versatile musician . . . self-contained 
and calm throughout the busiest day 
. . . pleasantly cheerful. 



Helen Gass Lunger 
Business 

Takes her wor\ seriously . . . good 
business-woman . . . never raises her 
voice . . . sincere, pleasant laugh. 



no 




Roslyn Fish Mateles 
Publication 

Volatile movement . . . talent unlim- 
ited . . . posters that are the pride oj 
the school . . . busy. 



Shirley McNeil 
Publication 

Little Iodine with poise . . . casual 
efficiency . . . not so high but mighty. 






Mary Roswell Leavitt 
Science 

Five-foot-two . . . eyes of blue 
the athletic scientist. 



Sandra MacLean 
Social Science 

Unstudied enthusiasm . . . the unme- 
thodic . . . frequently inspired . . . 
never do today what can be put off. 



11 1 




> 



• 



Muriel Edna Menzies 
Nursing 

Canadian businesswoman . . . now 
New Hampshire's Public Health 
nurse. 




Marjorie Sandra Melnick 
Publication 

Always jeminine . . . classes are in- 
terruptions between travels . . . liveable. 





Marcela Luisa Messany 
Library Science 

The Latin flavor . . . adept dancer 
. . . serenity . . . fascination of the 
quiet person . . . inquiring student. 



Barbara Ann Miller 
Retailing 

School spirit and enthusiasm for any 
underlaying . . . All-American loo\ 
. . . scintillating smile. 



112 



Sandra Hunter Morrison 
Business 

Soft-spoken charm . . . gentlemen pre- 
fer blonds . . . unconscious grace and 
poise. 



Josephine Anna Morello 
Science 

An infectious giggle keeps labs alive 
. . . an educational path beaten from 
Beacon Hill to the Fenway. 



Mary Frances Moran 
Library Science 

Blond bon vivant with a taste for 
antiques . . . a modern girl who li\es 
the simple life. 






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Helen Ewing Mitchell 
Retailing 

Demure yet funloving . . . a good 
listener . . . the common-sense ap- 
proach. 



Marilyn Faith Miller 

Social Science 

As pretty as a Romantic novel . . . 
lively . . . wide-eyed innocence, 
wise maturity . . . unassuming 
charm. 



M 




113 




■ 



Anne Barbara Murgia 
Retailing 

Quiet beauty in her smile . ... as grac- 
ious and serene as a portrait in any 
circumstances. 




Ruth Elizabeth Oja 
Nursing 

Good health and good cheer . . . 
outgoing and energetic . . . confi- 
dent and conscientious. 





Marilyn Susanna Olson 
Social Science 

Keynote: awareness . . . imaginative 
approach . . . dramatically talented 
. . . tradition with an eye to the future. 



Arline Vincent O'Neill 
Business 

Neat and sandy-haired with lots of 
spun\ . . . many good ideas sprout 
from her. 



114 



Constance Jane Pennington 
Social Science 

Regal elegance . . . humanitarian en- 
deavors . . . the art of subtle humor. 



Louise Isola Payne 
Business 

Always doing something . . . many 
crises conquered . . . friendly and vi- 
vacious, shows her lining for people. 



Madeline Paul 
Library Science 

Sweet and sincere, \nows her own 
mind . . . the right word at the right 
time. 





i 









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y 



Sheila Ann Orlinsky 
Social Science 

Teacher smaller than her students 
. . . reigning with a firm hand 
. . . no bit of history she doesn't 
know. 




Lilly Belle Panella 
Home Economics 

Mischieviously flirtatious . . . infinitely 
capable . . . versatility of the seamstress 
par excellence and pianistic perfection. 



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1 15 





Janet Ida Phillips 
Business 

Efficiency . . . good health and good 
spirit . . . unfailingly helpful with a 
word for everyone . . . genuine. 




Joanne Louise Porter 
Science 

Equanimity through excitement . . . 
generous . . . many-faceted . . . a mel- 
low, resonant quality. 





Marcia Clara Rhodes 
Science 

With the enviable curl . . . compat- 
ibility and loyalty . . . intensity of 
effort. 



Victoria Ann Reichert 
Science 

Efficient . . . under the freckles, a 
warm and understanding nature . . . 
capacity for understatement. 




Ann Rees 
Nursing 

Small and excitable . . . only nurse 
who can wal\ upright under the hos- 
pital beds . . . a loyal, helpful friend. 





Sheila Judith Porter 
Science 

Glistens with zeal . . . a constant slate 
of panic, blessed with an unlimited 
supply of warmth. 



Jeanne Sibyl Potischman 
Home Economics 

Her goals always clearly in sight . . . 
helping hand that ma\es the tas\ 
lighter. 



117 




Risa Rickman 
Publication 

Expressive eyes . . . calm force behind 
the storm . . . inspires the best in every- 
one . . . volatile, versatile, reassuring. 




Marion Faith Rogers 
Social Science 

School enthusiasm undimmed by 
subway's pressure . . . candid . . . 
capricious though serious in her 
goals. 





Carol Fay Rosenblum 
Social Science 

Sparkling eyes that hypnotize . . . so 
delightfully herself . . . never a frown 
... a sunny day in April. 



Marcia Norton Ross 
Home Economics 

Pert and piquant . . . that enviable 
platinum blond hair and deep dimple. 



Ann Marie Schmidt 
Home Economics 

Calmly sweet in manner and appear- 
ance . . . patient attention to details 
. . . genuine trust in everyone. 



Mary Nancy Scandura 
Nursing 

Genuinely sympathetic . . . forever in 
an uproar . . . can always cheer you up. 



Patricia Dawn Ryerson 

Library Science 

Shines with an eager good-will 
jrom her lips — delightful chatter 
vitality. 







Beverly Jean Ryd 
Library Science 

Glows with vitality and understanding 
. . . her presence is felt before she 
spea\s. 



Margaret Witton Russell 
Publication 

An intelligent young woman . . . 
our efficiency expert . . . sincerity 
and unhurried, unfailing profic- 
iency. 




119 



Gail Edith Scofield 
Social Science 

Easily out-going . . . integral part of 
every activity . . . talkative and tal- 
ented . . . gregarious. 




t 



Betty Louise Sebastian 
Nursing 

Leisurely but potent witticism . . . 
cheerful and dependable . . . a credit 
to her profession. 




Jane Skillman Seymour 
Social Science 

Master of satirical wit . . . unbounded 
enthusiasms . . . politically oriented 
. . . effervescent laughter. 



Judith Ann See 
Publication 

Has the style of an individualist 
photography and dramatics . . . 
active personality. 





the 



120 




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Joan Marjorie Sharrow 
Social Science 

Rich in poise and completeness . 
interested and cheerful . . . ta\es 
friendships seriously. 




Janet Marilyn Shapiro 
Publication 

Dualism of sense and sensibility . . . 
member of the literati . . . perceptive 
. . . the tactful touch . . . talent for 
doing things well. 




Naomi Harper Shaffer 
Nursing 

Her elfish spirits are unquenchable . . . 
gets her wor\ done despite confusions 
and interruptions. 




Frima Goldman Shapiro 
Home Economics 

Smile that welcomes confidence . . . 
glow of energy . . . a clear head and 
a quic\ mind. 



121 







Leslie Jeanne Smith 
Nursing 

Set world's record for fast wheelchair 
pushing . . . laughs at the right thing 
at the right time . . . fran\ and friendly. 








■-vh : iwn 



Sally Marvin Speir 
Retailing 

Casual grace . . . a knowing silence 
. . . ready smile and cheerful words. 



V 



Elizabeth Freeman Spencer 
Science 

No job is unimportant . . . positive 
results from an eager mind . . . bril- 
liance in manner. 



122 




Eva Marie Stern 

Social Science 

The sophisticate . . . ingenuously 
charming . . . air of the con.'-nental 
. . . a page from Vogue. 



Carol Seiders Steele 
Home Economics 

Loving the outdoors . . . healthy in- 
sistence on athletic well-being . . . 
sincere. 







Paula Lewis Spound 
Social Science 

Young woman with convictions . . . 
the active personality . . . ta\es care 
of the little things . . . a zest for living. 



Beverly Stearns 
Nursing 

Blithe unconcern . . . a strawberry- 
blond bundle of confusion . . . jaunty 
attitude over real sincerity. 



123 





Stephenie Smith Stewart 
Publication 

Pert and pretty . . . her smile reveals a 
sparkling personality ... zest for life. 



Sarah Jane Stout 
Publication 

Knows how to carry a silence . 
infinite patience . . . a cool, ca 
less, Nordic beauty. 





Mary Elizabeth Sughrue 
Business 

Stately as she is charming . . . con- 
scientious . . '. spar\le in her eyes re- 
veals a merry spirit. 



Margaret Finlay Sutton 
Nursing 

M.G.H. graduate to Simmons. Will it 
be teaching or marriage? 



124 



Joan Law Walters 
Home Economics 

The bustling home ec-er . . . words 
aren't words without gestures . . . ex- 
hausting energy gets things done. 



Phyllis Eleanor Turransky 
Science 

Quiescence in loo\s and manner . . . 
intelligence personified . . . a traveler 
with a purpose. 



Mary Alice Tulloch 
Nursing 

Serene . . . adds dignity unconsciously 
. . . gives her uniform style and her 
u'oi\ competence. 






Carol Goldmeer Tankel 
Business 

Conscientious . . . reserve and 
quiet strength are her assets. 




Lydia Evelyn Thomas 
Nursing 

Registered nurse to traveler . . . study 
at Simmons and now a master's. 




125 



Roberta Weisman 
Retailing 

Personification of gentleness and 
warmth . . . glows with love of life 
. . . changing moods . . . imp in dis- 
guise. 




Elise Franck Wertheim 
Retailing 

Perky and jaunty . . . a leprechaun's 
manner . . . fresh outloo\ . . . gracious 
attitude. 




Roberta Frances Wilson 
Nursing 

Overwhelming enthusiasm for her 
wor\ and life . . . crisp as her uniform 
and twice as competent. 



Virginia Ann Williams 
Science 

Good-natured . . . every situation a 
subject for a story . . . talented mimic. 





126 




/ 



Elaine Louise Woodman 
Nursing 

In perpetual motion . . . on the spot 
when there's help needed . . . red- 
haired hypodermic needle. 




Judith Anne Wolper 
Business 

A redhead with an even temper . . . 
bubbling with fun . . . lives to music 
. . . cordial. 





Toby Buchhalter Wintrub 
Retailing 

Her cheerful friendliness and coopera- 
tion made her \nown, where other 
transfers often get lost. 



Barbara Gay Witmondt 
Retailing 

Cheering words . . . a song and smile 
. . . enthusiasm for every experience 
. . . and every experience an adventure. 



127 



Virginia Fife Wright 
Social Science 

Essence of a lady . . . contagious grin 
and constant air of fun . . . disorganiz- 
ed organization. 




Marcia Bates Worcester 
Nursing 

Tacit tranquility . , . mercurial yet 
reflective . . . congenial companion . . . 
compliant and easy-going. 





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1 



Anna Louise Wurzbacher 
Nursing 

Business woman . . . to the Navy, on 
to nursing . . . and now Simmons. 



128 




Margaret Alice Young 
Home Economics 

The natural loo\ . . . a smile that says 
friendship . . . calm, cool, and charm- 
ing. 



Joan Clair Zweigbaum 
Science 

Sympathetic ear for all . . . efficiency 
plus . . . the little girl with all the 
energy. 



Barbara Ann Zonis 
Library Science 

Even-tempered . . . woman against the 
cloc\ . . . warm smile expressing a 
cheerful personality. 





Electra Yankopoulos 
Science 

Model for Praxiteles . . . a study in 
contrasts . . . to mystify is to fascinate 
. . . original approach to the ordinary. 



129 



STUDENT DIRECTORY 



JANE SHERMAN ADAMS, 7 University Avenue, Chatham, New Jersey. 

Dorm Representative to Social Activities 2 ; Dorm Treasurer 3 ; Dorm 

President 4. 

HELEN JEAN ADDISON, 87 Bartlett Avenue, Belmont, Massachusetts. 

Sock and Buskin 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 1, 2: Christian Assjciation 

1, 2, 3 ; Microcosm Technical Editor 4 ; Assembly Series 4 ; Review 4 ; 

Class Executive Board 3 ; Spring Spree Program Chairman 3 ; Usher 

President's Installation 3 ; Olde English Dinner 3, 4 : Compets 1, 2, 3. 

MARY LEE ADRIANCE, 6 School Street, Andover, Massachusetts. 

Outing Club 1 : Transfer Welcome 3 ; Anne Strong 2, 3, 4. 

ENA ALMULY, 1724 Beacon Street, Brookline, Massachusetts. Hillel 

1, 2, 3 : YWCA 1 ; Sophomore Luncheon 2 ; International Student 
Center 3 : Political Thought and Action 4. 

DAWN BLANCHE ANDERSON. Box 95, Port Morris, New Jersey. 
Class President 1 ; May Breakfast Chairman 2 ; Forum Secretary 3, 
President 4 ; Academy 3, 4 ; Review 4. 

RUTH CAROLINE ANGELL, 19 Maple Street, Randolph, Vermont. 
Christian Association 1, 2 ; Glee Club 1 ; College Voucher 3 ; Dorm 
President 4 ; Junior Welcome 3 ; Political Thought and Action 2, 3, 
President 4 ; Co-chairman of Announcements and Class Day 4. 
MARION SARA APTER, Grennan Road, West Hartford, Connecticut. 
Political Thought and Action. 

BARBARA AUGUST, 525 Sunderland Road, Teaneck, New Jersey. 
Sock and Buskin 3, 4 ; Microcosm Publicity Manager 4 ; Strawberry 
Breakfast 2 : Dorm Social Activities Chairman 4. 

CLARA AUGUSTA AUSTIN, 89 East Main Street, Clinton, Connecti- 
cut. Prince Club 2, 3, 4. 

B 
WENDY BAKER. 155 West 41st Street, Erie, Pennsylvania. Outing 
Club 1, 2 : Anne Strong 2, 3. 

MURIEL PHYLIS BALTIMORE, 62 Henry Avenue. Lynn, Massa- 
chusetts. Hillel 1, 2: Ellen Richards 2, 3, 4 ; Junior Welcome 3: Dorm 
Council 2 ; Skit Night Dorm Chairman 2 : Secretary-Treasurer of Dorm 
2 ; Freshman-Junior Jamboree 3 : Political Thought and Action 2. 
DOROTHY BENNETT. 716 Elmgrove Avenue, Providence, Rhode Island. 
Hillel 1 : Social Relations 3, 4 : Dorm Secretary 4. 

MARY ELIZABETH BENNETT, 3 Richmond Street, Dover, New 
Hampshire. IVCF 1, 2, 3, Secretary 2 ; Anne Strong 2, 3. 
JUDITH BADGERS BERMAN. 15 Short Street. Brookline, Massachu- 
setts. Hillel 3, 4 ; Ellen Richards 2,3.4; Academy ; Microcosm Assist- 
ant Circulation Editor 4; Sock and Buskin 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Junior Welcome 3. 
GWENDOLYN JUNE BICKFORD. White Oaks Road, Gilmanton Iron 
Works, New Hampshire. Ellen Richards 2. 3, 4, Senior Representa- 
tive 4. 

PHYLLIS ROSE BORNSTEIN, 72S Morton Street, Mattapan, Massa- 
chusetts. Ellen Richards 2, 3, 4 ; Hillel 1, 4. 
NANCY ELIZABETH BOWKER, R.D. I. Eliot, Maine. Anne Strong 

2, 3, 4. 

JOAN REBECCA BRADLEY, 19 Elmhurst Avenue, Waterbury, Con- 
necticut. Newman Club ; Graduate Nurses' Club. 

JOAN WARING BRADY, 26 Brookside Drive, Cranston, Rhode Island. 
Honor Board 2 ; Leaders' Workshop 2 ; Newman Club 1, 2 ; House 
Council 4. 

RONNA JO BRICKMAN, 119 Wyman Street. Medford, Massachusetts. 
Sock and Buskin 1. 2; Hillel 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Leaders' Workshop 2; Riding 
Club 1 ; Junior Welcome 3 : Sophomore Valentine Party 2 ; Political 
Thought and Action 4 : Christmas Cotillion 1, 2. 

MARION ANITA BRODY, 611 Mountain Drive, South Orange, New 
Jersey. Sock and Buskin 3 : Hillel 1. 

RENEE PHYLLIS BRUCKNER, 330 West 72nd Street, New York, 
New York. House Council 3 : Hillel 1 ; Spring Spree 3 ; Skit Night 1,2,3. 
PHYLLIS ISENMAN BUCHSBAUM, 118 The Riverway, Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. Modern Dance 1. 2, 3, 4. 

BARBARA GERTRUDE BUCKLEY, 43 Brookdale Road, Newtonville, 
Massachusetts. Class Executive Board 1 ; Class Secretary 2, 3, 4 ; 
Honor Board 4 : Junior Welcome 3 : Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 
JOAN ELIZABETH BUCKLEY. 14 Kensington Road, Arlington, Mas- 
sachusetts. Co-chairman Freshman Prom 1 ; Honor Board 1, 4 ; Class 
President 2 ; Junior Welcome Steering Committee 3 ; House Senior 4. 
MARJORIE JANE BURRILL, Scotland, Connecticut. Graduate 
Nurses' Club. 

JUDITH ANN BYMAN, 67 Atkins Street, Meriden, Connecticut. 
Christian Association 1, 2 ; Ellen Richards 2, 3, 4 ; Junior Prom 3. 

C 

PHYLLIS EDNA CAMERON, 10 Fairview Street, White River Junc- 
tion, Vermont. 

NANCY PATRICIA CARROLL, 28 Parkway Road, Medford, Massa- 
chusetts. Newman Club 1. 2, 3, 4 ; Microcosm Advertising Co-editor 4. 
RENEE LYNN CHASALOW, 31 Pine Street, West Orange, New Jersey. 
Modern Dance Club 1, 2, 3 ; Physical Therapy Club 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Spring 
Spree 3 : Sophomore Prom 2 : Assistant Fire Chief 4. 
EMOGENE ANN CHASE. Pine Plains, New York. Anne Strong 2 ; 
House Council 3, 4 : Social Relations 4 : Leaders' Workshop 4. 
FRANCES ADA CHIABRANDY, 3 Morton Avenue. Saugus, Massa- 
chusetts. Executive Board 1 ; Outing Club 1, 2 ; Spring Spree 2 ; 
House Council 3 ; Transfer Welcome 3 ; NEWS Treasurer 4 ; Curricu- 
lum Committee 3 ; Bookstore Committee 4. 

SYLVIA ROSITA CHIESA, 64 Charles Street, Dorchester, Massachu- 
setts. Ellen Richards 2, 3, 4 : Leaders' Workshop 2, 3 ; Stu-G Assistant 
Treasurer 3 : Microcosm Business Manager 4. 

AUDREY BARBARA CLOPER, 178 Chester Avenue, Chelsea, Massa- 
chusetts. Hillel 1, Treasurer 2, 3; Sock and Buskin 2; Sophomore 
Prom 2 : Junior Prom Seating Chairman 3 : Junior Welcome 3 ; Sopho- 
more Luncheon 2. 

ARLENE LEVY COHEN, 821 Beacon Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 
Prince Club 3. 4. 

JULIA McMAHON COLLINS, 125 Blue Hills Parkway, Milton, Massa- 
chusetts. Newman 1, 2, 3. 4; Home Economics 2, 3, 4; Chairman 
Sophomore Auction 2 : Leaders' Workshop 2 ; Social Activities Commit- 
tee 3 : Stu-G Chairman of Social Activities 4. 

ELLEN ELGART CONOVITZ, 69 Old Pond Road, Great Neck, New 
York. Transfer from Connecticut College. 

SHEILA CONSTANCE CORMACK. Guantanamo Sugar Company, 
Guantanamo, Oriente, Cuba. Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Fire 
Proctor 3. 4: Skit Night 1, 3: Food Representative 4. 
CONSTANCE FRANCES COSTIGAN, 1106 Del D'or Drive, West Point 
Pleasant, New Jersey. Skit Night 3 : House Senior 4 ; House Council 
4 ; Social Relations 4 ; Assistant Art Editor Microcosm 4 ; Art Editor 
Review 4. 



ANN MARIE COUGHLIN, 52 Dexter Road, Lexington. Massachusetts. 

Transfer from Lasell Junior College ; Newman Club 3, 4 ; Outing Club 3. 
SYLVIA ALLEN COUTTS, 3557 Third Avenue, San Diego, California. 
Freshman Prom Program Chairman 1 ; Junior Welcome 3 ; Spring 
Spree Parents' Day Chairman 3 ; Honor Board 3, 4 ; Class Executive 
Board 3, 4 ; Academy 3, 4 ; Senior Week 4 ; Review 4. 
RUTH GARDNER CRIDER, 10 Shepard Street, Cambridge, Massa- 
chusetts. Junior Welcome 3 ; Athletic Association Riding Chairman 3, 
4 : Review 4. ' 

JOAN FRANCES CUMMINGS, 99 Cedar Street, Rye, New York. 
Prince Club 3, 4, Treasurer 3 ; Spring Spree 3. 

JOAN PAULA DALEY, 250 Russett Road, Brookline, Massachusetts. 
Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Representative to IRCC 3 ; Glee Club 1, 2 ; 
Dorm Council 1 ; Junior Prom 3 ; Cap and Gown Chairman 4 ; Olde 
English Dinner 4 ; Dorm Representative to Stu-G 4. 
JOAN LOUISE DAMON, 106 Vernon Avenue, South Barre, Massachu- 
setts. Outing Club 1, 2, Treasurer 3 : Anne Strong 2, 3 ; Executive 
Board 2 : Sophomore Luncheon 2 : IVCF 3. 

JUDITH HANSIS .DAVIES, 548 High Street. Medford, Massachusetts. 
Glee Club 1. Librarian 2 ; Class K^-Tutive Board I. 

JUDITH SANDRA DAVIS. 123 Sutherland Road, Brighton, Massachu- 
setts. Hillel 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Sock and Buskin 1, 2 ; Sophomore Luncheon 2 ; 
Junior Welcome 3 ; Social Relations 1, 2, 3, 4 : Chairman Freshman- 
Senior Mixer 4 : Assistant Photography Editor Microcosm 4. 
PRISCILLA ANN DAVIS, Wells, Mains. Academy 3, Secretary- 
Treasurer 4. 

CONSTANCE MAY DELOREY, 6 Dennison Avenue, Swampscott, 
Massachusetts. Graduate Nurses' Club. 

JOYCE ELIZABETH DeSILVIA, 44 Harrison Street, Taunton, Massa- 
chusetts. Junior Welcome 3 ; Newman Club President 4 ; Academy 4 : 
Senate 4. 

CAROL JOAN DeSTEFANO. 162 Metropolitan Avenue, Roslindale, 
Massachusetts. Home Economics Club 2, 3, Tea Chairman 4 ; Execu- 
tive Board 2, 4 : Christian Science Organization 2, 3. 
PATRICIA LINGLEY DICKSON, 215 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, 
Massachusetts. ^Ei'ince Club t. 

JULIA ANN DILLON, 378 Grove Street, Melrose, Massachusetts. 
Physical Therapy Club 2. 3, '4 ; Modern Dance Club 1, 2, 3 ; Freshman 
Prom 1 : Sophomore Prom 2 : Junior Welcome 8. 

MARILYN BARBARA DOLIN. 1503 Meadowbrook Drive, Syracuse, 
New York. Executive Board 1 ; Skit Night 3 ; Academy 3, 4 ; House 
President 4 ; Hillel 1, 2 ; Review 4. 

GAIL ELAINE DONTIGNEY, 298 Broad Street, Meriden, Connecticut. 
House Senior 4 ; Dorm Representative to Social Activities '4 ; Volun- 
teer Work 4 ; Mav Breakfast 2. 

EVELYN JANE DOWD, 10 Edward Avenue, Milton, Massachusetts. 
Outing Club 1, 2: Sock and Buskin 1, 2. 3, 4 Treasurer 3; Mimeo- 
graph Chairman 3 ; Microcosm 2 ; Stu-G Treasurer 4. 
YVETTE MARIE DOWLING, 11 Chase Road, Waltham, Massachusetts. 
Sock and Buskin 1, 2, 3. 4 ; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 
MARY WILMA DREIER. 543 Lakewood Avenue, Ocean Gate, New 
Jersey. Transfer from Denison University 2 ; Modern Dance Club 2, 3 ; 
Physical Therapy Club 2, 3 ; Secretary-Treasurer 3, 4 ; Chairman Trans- 
fer Welcome 3 ; Co-chairman Junior Prom 3 ; House Senior 4. 
ELIZABETH LEONA DUNCAN, 16 Dufton Court, North Andove,, 
Massachusetts. Ellen Richards 2, 3, 4 ; Outing Club 3, 4 ; Junior Rep- 
resentative to Forum 3 : Biology Seminar Committee 4. 
SYLVIA ANNE DYKE. 648 South Christine Street, Wichita, Kansas. 
Volunteer Work 2 ; Spring Spree 3 ; Christian Association 4 ; Olde 
English Dinner 4. 

E 
MARGARET DAVIDSON EBERLEIN, Box 162, Newtown, Connecticut. 
Modern Dance Club 1 ; Le Cercle Fvaucais 1 ; Bookstore Committee 1 ; 
Leaders' Workshop 2 ; Assembly Series 2 ; Vice-President of Dorm 2 ; 
Associate Managing Editor of NEWS 2 ; Stu-G Representative to 
Review 3 ; Dorm Representative to Stu-G 3 : Academy 3, 4 ; Vice Presi- 
dent of Stu-G 4. 

JANE PRENTICE ETTINGER, 16 Overlook Road, Scarsdale, New York. 
Prince Club 2, 3, 4 : Spring Spree 3. 

F 
GAIL ENID FALCONER. 451 Bogert Avenue, Ridgewood, New Jersey. 
Freshman House Chairman 1 ; YWCA 1 ; Sock and Buskin 1, Advertis- 
ing Manager 2; IVCF 1, 2. President 3, 4; Poster Committee 3, 4; 
IRCC 4 : Editorial Assistant of NEWS 4 ; Simmons Handbook 4 ; 
Review 4. 

ENID MARILYN FELDMAN, 186 Bainbridge Street, Maiden, Massa- 
chusetts. Hillel 1, 4 ; NEWS Reporter 1, 2, 3, Managing Editor 4 ; 
Leaders' Workshop 3 ; Sock and Buskin 1 ; Review 4. 
CONSTANCE LEE FIELDS, 399 Chapman Street, Canton, Massachu- 
setts. Modern Dance Club 1, 3. 

NATALIE JEAN FITTS, 804 Main Street, Lynnfield Center, Massa- 
chusetts. House President 3 ; Junior Welcome 3. 

PHYLLIS ELAINE FLAHERTY, 51 Fairfield Avenue, South Norwalk, 
Connecticut. Newman Club 1 ; Social Relations 2 ; Entertainment 
Chairman Sophomore Prom 2 ; Freshman-Junior Jamboree 3 ; Spring 
Spree 3 : Dorm President 4 : Senate 4 ; Chairman Senior Dance 4. 
SYLVIA ANN FLIGHT, 100 Burgess Avenue, Westwood, Massachu- 
setts. Junior Welcome 3 ; Executive Board 3, 4 ; Poster Committee 3, 
4 : Sock and Buskin 3. 4. 

MARTHA WHEATLEY FOSTER, 258 Hollow Tree Ridge Road, Da- 
rien. Connecticut. YWCA 2. 3 ; Fund Drive Committee 3 ; Christmas 
Cotillion 3. 

SANDRA ELAINE FRANK, 23 Ruskin Street, Providence, Rhode 
Island. Social Relations 1. 2, 3 President 4; Blazer Chairman 1: Junior 
Welcome 3 ; House Council 4 ; Freshman-Sophomore Valentine Party 2 ; 
Hillel 1, 2: Volunteer Work 1. 2, 3, 4 ; Sophomore Luncheon 2. 
MEREDITH EASTER FRAZER. 32 Pleasant Street. Aver. Massachu- 
setts. Glee Club 2 : Sock and Buskin 2, 3, 4 : NSA 2 ; House President 
3 ; Skit Night 3 : Olde English Dinner 4 ; Co-chairman of Announce- 
ments and Class Day 4. 

VIRGINIA KUEHNER FUSICK, 524 Advent Street, Westbury, New 
York. Graduate Nurses' Club 3, 4 : Newman Club 3, 4. 

G 
PATRICIA MARGARET GALLANT. 48 Hanscom Avenue. Reading, 
Massachusetts. Newman Club 1, 2, 3, Treasurer 4 : Ellen Richards 2, 
3. President 4 : Junior Welcome 3 : Chairman Food Committee 3. 
DOREEN GARDNER. 115 Nichols Street, Everett, Massachusetts. 
Physical Therapy Club 2, 3, 4 : Hillel 1, 2, 3. 

NANCY LOUISE GARLAND, Sandwich, Massachusetts. Glee Club 3. 
President 4. 



130 



STUDENT DIRECTORY 



PATRICIA ANN GAUGHAN, 119 Chestnut Street, Needham, Massa- 
chusetts. Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Home Economics Club 2 ; Junior 
Welcome 3. 

ELAINE ANNE GAYSUNAS, 15 Williams Street, Newton Upper Falls, 
Massachusetts. Transfer from Lasell Junior College ; Spring Spree 3 ; 
Newman Club 3, 4 ; Circulation Manager of Microcosm 4 ; Sock and 
Buskin 4. 

LYNNE JANICE GOLDINGER, 211 West 35th Street, Wilmington, 
Delaware. Outing Club 1, 2; Hillel 1, 2, 3 President 2; NEWS Re- 
porter 1, 2, 3 Editor 4; Stu-G Council 4; Review 4. 

IRMA JOY GOLDMAN, 69 Ballard Drive, West Hartford, Connecticut. 
Sophomore Prom 2 ; Publicity-Decorations Chairman of Spring Spree 3 ; 
MC Skit Night 3, 4 ; Assistant Business Manager and Executive Secre- 
tary of Microcosm 4. 

KATHLEEN VETROMILE GONSALVES, 52 Woodward Street, Ever- 
ett, Massachusetts. Sock and Buskin 2, 3 ; Newman Club 2, 3 ; Poster 
Committee 3- 

JUNE JOHNS'lUN GONZALEZ, 8 y 19, Vedado, Havana, Cuba. Execu- 
tive Board 2 ; Leaders' Workshop 2 ; NSA 3, Chairman International 
Affairs Commission ; Stu-G 4, Chairman of Workshop and NSA. 
BARBARA LETHA LOIS GOODELL, Sea Street, East Dennis, Massa- 
chusetts. Transfer from Pennsylvania College for Women ; Chairman 
of Tea, Transfer Welcome 3 ; Outing Club 3, President 4 ; Music Listen- 
ing Committee Chairman 3^ 4. 

SANDRA MALVER GOODMAN, 309 West Mall Place, Glendale, Wis- 
consin. Transfer from Smith College 3 ; Physical Therapy Club 3, 4 ; 
Academy 4. 

PRISCILLA STEPHANNE GREENE, 1875 Commonwealth Avenue, 
Brighton, Massachusetts. Ellen Richards Club 2, 3, 4. 
LOIS RITA GREENSPAN, 154 Kearny Avenue, Perth Amboy, New 
Jersey. NEWS 2 ; Junior Welcome 3 ; Dorm Treasurer 4. 
JEANNETTE ELIZABETH GRISE, 873 Chestnut Street, Waban, Mas- 
sachusetts. Ellen Richards 2, 3, 4 ; Academy 3, 4 ; Newman Club 1, 4. 
LILLIAN MAVIS GUERNEY, Vernon Street, Bethel, Maine. Chris- 
tian Association 1, 2; House Senior 4; Spring Spree 1, 2; President'^ 
Installation 3; Social Relations 1, 2, 3, 4; Skit Night 1, 3; House 
Council 3, 4. 

EMILIE ANNE GUSTAFSON, 155 George Street, Arlington, Massa- 
chusetts. IVCF 1, 2, Treasurer 3; Glee Club 2, Secretary 3; Anne 
Strong 2, 3 ; Paramount Uniform Award 2 ; Junior Welcome 3 ; Bas- 
ketball 3. 

GENEVIEVE MARY GUZIK, 250 Bronxville Road, Bronxville, New 
York. Newman Clu"b 1, 2, Program Chairman 3, Secretary 4 ; Outing 
Club 2; Prince Cldb 2, 3, 4; Junior Welcome 3; Executive Board 3; 
Social Activities Dorm Representative 3, Campus Chairman 4 ; Presi- 
dent's Installation 3 ; Sophomore Luncheon 2 : Jazz Concert Co-chau-- 
man 3 ; Spring Spree Dance Co-chairman 3 ; House Presidents* Council. 

H 
NATALIE MARIANNE HADDAD, 144 Jackson Street, Willimantic, 
Connecticut. Ellen Richards 2, 3, 4 ; Freshman Handbook 2 ; Spring 
Spree 3 ; Student Invitation Days Refreshment Chairman 3 ; Bookstore 
Committee 4 ; Constitution Committee 4 ; Fund Drive Committee 3. 
LOUISE HELENA HARIAN, 16 Little Pond Road, Belmont, Massa- 
chusetts. Outing Club 1 ; Sock and Buskin 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Junior Welcome 
3 ; Leaders* Workshop 2 ; Advertising Manager Microcosm 4. 
BARBARA FRANCES HARJU, Factory Street, Sandwich, Massa- 
chusetts. Transfer from University of New Hampshire ; Secretary to 
House Presidents' Council 4. 

JOYCE HARVEY, 802 Blue Hill Avenue, Dorchester, Massachusetts 
Modern Dance 2, 3 : Usher at Compets 2 : Sophomore Luncheon 2. 
AUDREY NIELSEN HAUGAARD, 31 Austin Street, Portland, Maine. 
Glee Club 1, 2, 3 ; Class Vice President 1, 2; Class President 3; Physi- 
cal Therapy Club 2, 3, President 4 ; Junior Welcome 3. 
MAYBELLE ANN HAUSER, 107 Waverly Street, Everett, Massachu- 
setts. Assembly Series 4 ; Transfer Welcome 3 ; Sock and Buskin 1, 2, 
3, Treasurer 4. 

MARY MARGARET HENDERSON, 225 Main Street, North Easton, 
Massachusetts. House President 3 ; Senate Moderator 4 ; Olde English 
Dinner 4 ; Junior-Freshman Jamboree 3 ; Rule Book Committee 3. 
ARDEN KNIGHT HERTZOG, 242 North Van Dien Avenue, Ridgewood, 
New Jersey. Christian Science Organization 1, 2, President 3, Secre- 
tary-Treasurer 4 ; House Senior 4 ; Freshman-Junior Jamboree 3 : Sen- 
ator 4; Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4 ; YWCA 1, 2, Secretary-Treas- 
urer 3. 

NANCY ANN HODGKINS, 72 Machigonne Street, Portland, Maine. 
Newman Club 1, Treasurer 2 ; Athletic Association Representative 1, 
Secretary 2, Vice President 3 ; House Senior 4. 

MURIEL CASHELL HOLUB, 1 Peterborough Street, Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. Modern Dance Club 2, 3 ; Physical Therapy Club 2, 3, 4 ; 
Junior Prom 3. 

DONNA HOWLAND, 156 Academy Street, Braintree, Massachusetts. 
Bluettes 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Executive Board 3 ; Dorm Social Activities Chair- 
man 3 ; House Senior 4 ; Olde English Dinner 4 ; Dorm Representative 
to Social Activities 4. 

MURIEL MARY HUBBARD, 9 Ware Street, Cambridge, Massachu- 
setts. Graduate Nurses* Club ; Glee Club. 

CONSTANCE MOORE HUGHES, 64 Gorham Street, Cambridge, Massa- 
chusetts. Graduate Nurses' Club. 

J 
CAROLE HAYES JAQUES, 48 Walden Street, Concord, Massachusetts. 
Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Sock and Buskin 1, 2, 3; Junior Welcome 
Steering Committee 3 ; NEWS 3 ; Spring Spree Treasurer 3 ; Class 
Treasurer 2, 3, 4; Senate 4; Business Manager Senior Week 4; Olde 
English Dinner 4. 

LILLI SVEA JOHANSON, Jaffrey, New Hampshire. Graduate Nur- 
ses' Club. 

ILENE EDELSTEIN JOHNSON, 27 Lanark Road, Brookline, Massa- 
chusetts. Hillel 1, 2; Modern Dance 1, 2 President 3; Review 4. 

K 
PENELOPE SEVESTE KARAGEORGE, 141 Chambers Street, New- 
burgh, New York. Orthodox Club 1, 2, 3, President 4: Vice President 
of Forum 3 ; Forum Representative 4 ; Chairman Freshman-Sophomore 
Party 2 ; Dorm Secretary 3 ; Assistant Literary Editor Microcosm 4 ; 
Compets 2 ; Review 4. 

IN A LEE KARELITZ, 198 Lcfayette Street, Salem, Massachusetts. 
Hillel l : NEWS 1. Circulation Manager 2, 3, Business Manager 4 ; 
Junior Welcome '£ ; Stu-G Workshop 4. 

SANDRA PATKIN KARP, 58 Beltran Street, Maiden, Massachusetts. 
Hillel. 

SANDRA MIRIAM KAUFMAN, 199 Strathmore Road, Brighton, Mas- 
sachusetts. 



LORRAINE JO-AN KECHEJIAN, 4 Grant Avenue. Belmont. Massa- 
chusetts. Sock and Buskin 1, 2 ; Sophomore Luncheon 2 ; Newman 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4 ; NEWS 2; Assembly Series 3; Executive Board 3, 4; 
Senate 4. 

ELIZABETH KEITH, 168 Grove Street, Putnam, Connecticut. Gradu- 
ate Nurses' Club Secretary. 

BARBARA ANN KELLEY, 99 Bynner Street, Jamaica Plain, Massa- 
chusetts. Ellen Richards 2, 3, 4 ; Outing Club 1; Newman Club 1,2,3.4. 
KAY ROBINSON KENNARD, 190 Topsfield Road, Wenham, Massa- 
chusetts. Christian Association 1 ; Sock and Buskin 1 ; Compets 1 ; 
Sophomore Luncheon 2 ; Sophomore Auction 2 : Fire Proctor 2 ; Food 
Representative 3 ; Prince Club 3, 4. 

JOAN FRANCES KENNEY, 83 Virginia Road, Concord, Massachusetts. 
Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Glee Club 1, 2; Volunteer Service 2; Sopho- 
more Auction 2; Leaders' Workshop 2; Outing Club 2; NEWS 2, 3, 4 ; 
Spring Spree 1, 2, 3 ; Microcosm 4 ; Prince Club 2, 3, Social Activities 
Chairman 4; Skit Night 1, 3. 

JOAN ANN KETTNER, R.F.D. 1, Hyannis, Massachusetts. 
SHIRLEY ANNE KIMBER, 80 Lawton Road, Needham, Massachusetts. 
Ellen Richards Club 2, 3, Secretary-Treasurer 4; Outing Club 3; Com- 
muter Representative to Social Activities Committee 4. 
MARY EVELYN KING, 728 Irving Place, Plainfield, New Jersey. 
Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Executive Board 2 ; House President 3 ; Jun- 
ior Welcome 3 ■ House Senior 4 : Olde English Dinner 4 ; Student Health 
Committee 4 ; Faculty Committee on Student Affairs 4 ; Review 4 ; Art 
Editor 4. Assistant Art Editor Microcosm. 

MARCIA JOAN KOVARA, 54 Forest Road, Tenafly, New Jersey. 
Transfer from Colby Junior College; Transfer Welcome 3; Sock and 
Buskin 2. Vice President 3, 4 : NEWS 3. Technical Editor 4 ; Review 4. 
NANCY ADELAIDE KRATZSCH, 246 Purchase Street, Milford, Massa- 
chusetts. Student Officers' Day 2 ; Sock and Buskin 3, Secretary 4 
Poster Committee 2. 

ELAINE KRAUSS, 152 Bard Avenue, Staten Island, New York. Junior 
Welcome 3 : Political Thought and Action President 3, 4. 
ROSANNE OLIVIA KUNZE, 86 School Street, Needham, Massachu- 
setts. Leaders* Workshop 2 ; Newman Club 2, 3, 4 ; Modern Dance 
Club 3 ; Olde English Dinner Seating Chairman 4. 

L 
PAULA BLOOMFIELD LANDAU, 370 Longwood Avenue, Boston, 
Massachusetts. Hillel 1 ; Skit Night 3 ; Social Activities Representa- 
tive 1 ; Co-chairman of Freshman-Junior Bib Party 3 ; Sophomore Prom 
2 : Spring Spree 3 : Freshman-Junior Jamboree 3. 

RUTH ALLEN LANE. 40 Parkwood Street, Springfield, Massachusetts. 
Anne Strong Club 2 ; Class Executive Board 4 ; Literary Editor of 
Microcosm 4 ; Review 4. 

JUDITH WARREN LAZZARA, 131 Summer Street, Stoneham, Massa- 
chusetts. Christian Association 2, 3 ; Junior Welcome Steering Commit- 
tee 3 : Leaders' Workshop 2. 

MARY ROSWELL LEAVITT, 1 Westview Terrace, Natick, Massa- 
chusetts. Ellen Richards 2, 3, 4 ; Athletic Association 3. 
ELAINE ANNE LeBARON, 56 South Street, Foxboro, Massachusetts. 
Sophomore Prom 2 ; Volunteer Work 2 : Christian Association 3 ; Christ- 
mas Cotillion 3 : House Council 4 ; Skit Night 3 ; President's Installa- 
tion 3 ; Prince Club 2, 3, 4. 

JEAN BERNADETTE LEE, 17 Upland Road, Cambridge, Massachu- 
setts. Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4 : Ellen Richards 2, 3, 4 ; Junior Welcome 
3 ; Academy 3, 4, Program Chairman ; Executive Board 4. 
VIRGINIA AUDREY LEVY, 563 Washington Street, Brookline, Massa- 
chusetts. 

RUTH EVA LEWIS, 79 Jordan Drive. Hampton, Virginia. Anne 
Strong 2, 3. 

LUCINDA ANNE LIKINS, 172 Lincoln Street, Melrose, Massachusetts. 
Prince Club 3. 4 : May Dav Breakfast 3. 

BARBARA MARR LININGTON, 818 Fourth Avenue, N.W., Minot, 
North Dakota. Outing Club 2, 3, 4 ; Prince Club 2, 3, 4 ; Junior Wel- 
come 3 : Class Executive Board 3, 4 ; Dorm Social Activities Chairman 
3 ; House President 4 : Senate 4 ; Co-chairman Student Invitation Days 
3 : Co-chairman Aquaintance Dance 3 ; Junior Prom 3 ; Christmas Co- 
tillion 4. 

BARBARA FRANCES LLOYD, 35 Spruce Street, Westerly, Rhode 
Island. Glee Club 1. 2, 3; Junior Welcome 3; Co-chairman Student 
Invitation Days 2 : Honor Board 3 : Bluettes 2, Leader 3. 
HELEN GASS LUNGER, 639 Arlington Avenue, Westfield, New 
Jersey. Glee Club 1. 2. 3:- Bluettes 3, Leader 4; Executive Board 3; 
Song Leader 4 ; Business Manager Junior Prom 3 ; Transfer Welcome 
3 : Honor Board Secretary 4. 



M 

SANDRA MacLEAN, 1595 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massa- 
chusetts. Glee Club 1, 2: Bluettes 2, 3; Leaders' Workshop 2, Com- 
mission Chairman 3 ; Junior Welcome Steering Committee 3 ; Executive 
Board 2, 3 : Song Leader 3 ; Stu-G Assistant Vice President 4. 
JANE DORIEN McDONALD, 12 North Carver Street, Warren, Penn- 
sylvania. Graduate Nurses' Club. 

SHIRLEY McNEIL. 25 North Quaker Lane, West Hartford, Con- 
necticut. Junior Welcome Steering Committee 3 : Dorm Vice Presi- 
dent 3 ; Dorm President 4 ; Spring Spree Program Chairman 3 ; Fresh- 
man-Sophomore Valentine Party 2 ; Volunteer Service 2 ; Review 4. 
SHEILA MARIE McKIVERGAN, 244 Pleasant Street, Providence, 
Rhode Island. 

ROSLYN FISH MATELES, 501 Beacon Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 
Poster Committee 1, 2, Chairman 3, 4 ; Hillel 1, Publicity Chairman 2, 
3, President 4 ; Junior Prom 3 ; Microcosm Assistant Art Editor 4 ; 
Review 4.- 

MARJORIE SANDRA MELNICK, 395 Broadway, Cambridge, Massa- 
chusetts. Hillel 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Sock and Buskin 1, 2; NEWS 3; Volunteer 
Work 2 ; Christmas Cotillion 1, 2 ; Associate Editor Microcosm 4 ; 
Review 4. 

MURIEL EDNA MENZIES, S5 Walnut Street, Manchester, New Hamp- 
shire. Graduate Nurses' Club. 

MARCELA LUISA MESSANY, 1057 LL. Jones, Santiago, Chile. 
Academy 3. 4. 

BARBARA ANN MILLER, R. R. 2, Sheboygan Falls, Wisconsin. 
Prince Club 2. 3 President 4: NewmanClub l, 2. 3. 4. Treasurer 3: Co- 
chairman Spring Spree 3 : Chairman Tickets Christmas Cotillion 3 ; 
Leaders' Workshop 2 ; Sophomore Auction 2 : Co-chairman Student 
Invitation Days 2 ; Junior Prom 3 ; Fire Captain 3 ; Class Vice Presi- 
dent 4. 

MARILYN FAITH MILLER. 2775 Morris Avenue, Bronx, New York. 
Glee Club 1 ; Sock and Buskin 1, 2, 3. President 4. 



131 



STUDENT DIRECTORY 



HELEN EWING MITCHELL, 112 Mill Lane, Mountainside, New Jer- 
sey. Prince Club 2, 3, 4 ; Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Skit Night 
1. 3 ; Fire Captain 1, 3. 

MARY FRANCES MORAN, 26 Greenway South, Albany, New York. 
Volunteer Work 2 ; Library Committee Chairman 4. 

JOSEPHINE ANNA MORELLO, 110 Chambers Street. Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, Le Cercle Francais 1 ; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Ellen Rich- 
ards 2, 3, 4 ; Transfer Welcome 3 : Representative to the New England 
Biological Conference 3. 

SANDRA HUNTER MORRISON, 144 Wellsville Street, Bolivar, New 
York. 

ANNE BARBARA MURGIA, 315 Prospect Street, Lawrence, Massa- 
chusetts. Transfer from Emerson College ; Prince Club 3, 4 ; Newman 
Club 3, 4. 

O 
RUTH ELIZABETH OJA, Pine Hedges, Chesham, New Hampshire. 
IVCF 1, Vice President 2. 3 ; Anne Strong 2, 3, 4 ; Transfer Welcome 
Graduate Committee Chairman 3 : Poster Row Chairman 3. 
MARILYN SUSANNA OLSON, 2235 Overlook Road, Cleveland Heights, 
Ohio. Sock and Buskin 1. 2, 3, 4 ; House Senior 4 ; Compets Director 4. 
ARLINE VINCENT O'NEILL, 17 Devereaux Street. Arlington, Massa 
chusetts. Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Executive Board 4. 
SHEILA ANN ORLINSKY, 150 Floyd Street, Belleville, New Jersey. 
Hillel 1 ; Social Relations 2, 3, 4 ; Junior Welcome 3 ; Microcosm 4 ; 
Spring Spree 2, 3 ; Strawberry Breakfast 2. 

P 
LILLY BELLE PANELLA, 101 Diana Drive, Poland, Ohio. Stu-G 
Assistant Treasurer 4 ; Home Economics Club 2, 3, 4 ; YWCA 1, 2, 
President 3 ; Spring Spree 3 : Junior Welcome 3. 

BEVERLEY BICKUM PARSONS, 275 Lexington Street, Auburndale, 
Massachusetts. Ellen Richards. Glee Club. 

MADELINE PAUL, 1902 Beacon Street, Brookline, Massachusetts. 
Outing Club 1 ; Junior Welcome 3 ; Hillel 4. 

LOUISE ISOLA PAYNE, 67 Hadley Road, South Burlington, Vermont. 
Sock and Buskin 1, 2, 3, 4 : Sophomore Luncheon 2 ; Junior Welcome 3 ; 
Refreshments and Decorations Chairman, Student Invitation Days 3. 
CONSTANCE JANE PENNINGTON, 10 High Street. Houlton, Maine. 
Executive Board 1 ; Sock and Buskin 1, 2, 3 ; NEWS 1 ; Volunteer Work 
Chairman 3 ; Social Relations Chairman 4 ; Academy 3, 4 ; Washington 
Semester 4- 

JANET IDA PHILLIPS. 61 Mitchell Street. Groton, Connecticut. 
NEWS 1, 2; Dorm Council 1, 2, 3; Sock and Buskin 1; Executive 
Board 2 ; Honor Board 3, Chairman 4 ; Class Vice President 3 ; Junior 
Welcome Steering Committee 3 ; Co-chairman President's Installation 

3 ; Advertising Manager Freshman Handbook 3. 

HELENA CATHERINE POIRIER, 91 Mason Street, Salem. Massa- 
chusetts. Graduate Nurses' Club. 

JOANNE LOUISE PORTER. 308 Third Street, Hackensack, New 
Jersey. Ellen Richards 2, 3, 4 : Modern Dance 1 ; Fund Drive Chair- 
man 3 ; Constitution Committee 4 ; Class Executive Board 1, 2, 3 ; 
Leaders' Workshop 2. 

SHEILA JUDITH PORTER, 11 Cherry Street, Salem, Massachusetts. 
Physical Therapy Club 1, 2; Hillel 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice President 3; Junior 
Welcome 3. 

JEANNE SIBYL POTISCHMAN, 7 Red Rock Street, Lynn, Massachu- 
setts. Home Economics Club 2, 3, 4 ; Volunteer Work 2 ; Bordon Award. 

R 
ANN REES, 15 Shepley Street, Auburn. Maine. Anne Strong 2, 3, 4 ; 
Junior Prom 3 ; Spring Spree 3 ; Junior Welcome 3. 
VICTORIA ANN REICHERT, 46 Clark Street, Dedham, Massachusetts. 
Physical Therapy Club 2, 3, 4 ; House Senior 4. 

MARCIA CLARA RHODES, 35 Florence Street, Taunton, Massachu- 
setts. Ellen Richards 2, 3, 4. 
RISA RICKMAN, 811 Main Street, Torrington, Connecticut. Academy 

4 ; Microcosm 3, Co-editor 4 ; Spring Spree Co-chairman 3 ; Dorm Coun- 
cil 2, Social Activities Chairman 3 ; Dorm Co-chairman of Skit Night 

1, 2, 3, 4 ; Review 4. 

MARION FAITH ROGERS, 8 Spring Street, Lexington, Massachu- 
setts. Newman Club 1, 2, 3. 4: Le Cercle Francais 1: Transfer Wel- 
come 3. 

CAROL FAY ROSENBLUM, 916 Woodlawn Road, Steubenville, Ohio. 
Social Relations 2 ; House Senior 4 : Spring Spree 3 ; Transfer Wel- 
come 3. 

MARCIA NORTON ROSS, Starbucks Neck, Edgartown, Martha's Vine- 
yard Island, Massachusetts. 

MARGARET WITTON RUSSELL, 96 Margin Street, West Newton, 
Massachusetts. Commuter Representative to Social Activities 2 ; Lead- 
ers' Workshop 2 ; Co-editor Freshman Handbook 3 ; Junior Welcome 
Steering Committee 3 ; Representative to Faculty Committee on Stu- 
dents and Student Affairs 3 • Class Executive Board 2, 4 ; Commuter 
Representative Stu-G 4 : Review 4. 

BEVERLY JEAN RYD, 197 Mystic Valley Parkway, Winchester, 
Massachusetts. IVCF 1, 2, 3, 4 : Executive Board 2 ; Library Committee 
2 ; House Senior 4 : Transfer Welcome 3. 

PATRICIA DAWN RYERSON, 44 Leonard Street, Portland, Maine. 
Christian Association 3, 4 ; Compets 3. 

S 
MARY ANN SACZYK, 77 Bonner Street, Hartford, Connecticut. Grad- 
uate Nurses' Club. 

KATHRYN MARY SAWYER, 57 Chestnut Street, Dedham, Massachu- 
setts. Academy. 

MARY NANCY SCANDURA, 175 Prospect Street, Lawrence, Massa- 
chusetts. Anne Strong 2, Vice President 3, 4 ; May Day Court 3 ; 
Executive Board 3: Skit Night 1. 2, 3 ; Sophomore Prom Co-chairman 
2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3 : Glee Club 1, 2; Spring Spree 3. 
ANN MARIE SCHMIDT, 48 Church Street, West Roxbury, Massachu- 
setts. Home Economics Club 2. 3, 4, Treasurer 4 ; Newman Club 1, 

2, 3, 4, Senior Representative 4 : Chairman Olde English Dinner 4 ; 
Fashion Show Chairman Student Invitation Days 3 ; Sophomore Lunch- 
eon 2 ; Sophomore Auction 2. 

GAIL EDITH SCOFIELD, Billington Road, East Aurora, New York. 
Transfer from St. Lawrence University ; Social Relations 3, 4 ; Policy 
Committee 3 ; Sock and Buskin 3 ; House Senior 4 ; N.S.A. Representa- 
tive 4. 
BETTY LOUISE SEBASTIAN, R.F.D. 3, Norwich, Connecticut. IVCF 

2, 3 ; Anne Strong 2, 3, 4. 

JUDITH ANN SEE, Eastwood Road, Woodmere, Long Island, New 
York. Transfer from University of Minnesota ; Sock and Buskin 2, 

3, 4 ; Microcosm Photography Editor 4 ; Compets Director 4 ; Transfer 
Welcome 3; NEWS 3: Review 4. 

JANE SKILLMAN SEYMOUR, 315 Dickinson Avenue, Swarthmore, 



Pennsylvania. Political Thought and Action ; Social Relations ; Cur- 
riculum Committee 3. 

NAOMI HARPER SHAFFER, 120 Main Street, Winchester, Massachu- 
setts. Transfer from Colby Junior College 2 ; Anne Strong 2, 3, 4, 
Publicity Chairman 2 ; Volunteer Work 3. 

FRIMA GOLDMAN SHAPIRO, 487 Main Street, Lewiston, Maine. 
Home Economics Club 2, 3, 4 ; NEWS 2 : Hillel 1. 

JANET MARILYN SHAPIRO, 35 Maiden Street, Everett, Massachu- 
setts. Class Executive Board 1, 2 ; Sock and Buskin 1, 2, President 3 ; 
Compets 1, 2, 3 ; Hillel 1, 2, 3 ; Forum Executive Board 2 : NEWS 1, 2, 

3 ; Junior Welcome Steering Committee 3 : Freshman Handbook Co- 
editor 3 ; Academy 3, 4, Publicity Chairman 3 ; Policy Committee 2, 
Advisor 3 ; Microcosm 3. Co-editor 4 : Review 4. 

JOAN MARJORIE SHARROW, 130 Garland Road, Newton Centre, 
Massachusetts. Transfer from Barnard College ; Social Relations 3, 4 ; 
Forum 3. 

LESLIE JEANNE SMITH, 275 Angell Street, Providence, Rhode Island. 
Newman Club 1, 2, 3 ; Anne Strong 2, 3, 4. 

SALLY MARVIN SPEIR, 225 South Division Street, Cashmere, Wash- 
ington. Transfer from Stanford University 2 ; Spring Spree 2 ; Co- 
chairman of Afternoon Program, Student Invitation Day 3 ; Prince 
Club 3, 4 : House Senior 4 : Social Relations 4. 

ELIZABETH FREEMAN SPENCER, 1356 Clifton Park Road, Sche- 
nectady, New York. Class President 4 : Dorm President 3 ; Chairman 
Small House Council 3 ; Co-chairman Freshman-Junior Bib Party 3 ; 
Junior Welcome Steering Committee 3 ; Ellen Richards 3 ; Academy 
3, 4 : Bluettes 2, 3, 4. 

PAULA LEWIS SPOUND, 418 Lovell Street, Worcester. Massachusetts. 
NSA Representative 1 ; Dorm Treasurer 2, 3 : Junior Welcome Steering 
Committee 3 ; Senator 4. 

BEVERLY STEARNS, North Conway, New Hampshire. Anne Strong 
2 3. 

CAROL SEIDERS STEELE, 50 Fordham Drive, Buffalo, New York. 
Outing Club 1. 2, 3, Vice President 4; Riding. Club 1, 2, 3; Home 
Economics Club 2, 3, 4. 

EVA MARIE STERN 3 Kensington Street, Andover, Massachusetts. 
Hillel 1 : Sophomore Prom 2 ; Spring Spree 3 : Junior Welcome 3 ; 
Dorm Vice President 4 ; Dorm Social Activities Chairman 2. 
STEPHENIE SMITH STEWART, 5 Morrison Avenue, Wakefield, 
Massachusetts. Freshman Prom 1 ; NSA 2 ; May Day 2 ; Junior Wel- 
come 3 : Leaders' Workshop 2 ; Senate 4 ; Review 4. 
SARAH JANE STOUT, Lowell. Ohio. Freshman-Junior Jamboree 3 ; 
Olde English Dinner 4 ; Art Editor Microcosm 4 ; Review 4 ; Assistant 
Fire Captain. 

MARY ELIZABETH SUGHRUE, 484 Brook Road. Milton. Massachu- 
setts. Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Co-chairman Sophomore Luncheon 2 ; 
Co-chairman Freshman Register 2 ; Junior Welcome 3 ; Athletic Asso- 
ciation Treasurer 3 : Junior Prom 3 ; Stu-G Secretary 4 ; Co-chairman 
Senior Week 4. 

MARGARET FINLAY SUTTON, Orleans, Massachusetts. Graduate 
Nurses' Club. 

T 
CAROL GOLDMEER TANKEL, 50 Naples Road. Brookline, Massachu- 
setts. Volunteer Work 1 ; Hillel 1 : Glee Club 2 ; Spring Spree 2. 3. 
LYDIA EVELYN THOMAS, 20701 Brantley Road, Shaker Heights, 
Ohio. Graduate Nurses' Club Treasurer 3. 

MARY ALICE TULLOCH. South Bethlehem, New York. Glee Club 1 ; 
Spring Spree 1 ; Anne Strong 2, President 3 ; Co-chairman Junior Prom 
3: ICC 3. 

BEATRICE LEEPER TURNER, Trenton, Missouri. Home Economics 
Club. 

PHYLLIS ELEANOR TURRANSKY, 75 Georgia Street. Roxbury, 
Massachusetts. Hillel 1, 2. 

W 
JOAN LAW WALTERS, 101 Parsons Street. Wallingford, Connecticut. 
Outing Club 1, 2; Home Economics Club 2, Vice President 3, President 

4 ; Head Usher President's Installation 3 ; Junior Prom 3 ; Co-chairman 
Senior Week 4. 

ROBERTA WEISMAN, 17 Atherton Circle, Lynnfield Centre, Massa- 
chusetts. Hillel 1, 2, 3 : Prince Club 3, 4; Sock and Buskin 1, 2, 8, 
Costume Chairman 1, 2. 

ELISE FRANCK WERTHEIM, 2 Sheridan Road, Scarsdale, New York. 
Prince Club 3, 4, Secretary 3. 

VIRGINIA ANN WILLIAMS, 116 Lindsey Street. Attleboro, Massa- 
chusetts. Ellen Richards 2, 3, 4 ; Junior Welcome 3. 
ROBERTA FRANCES WILSON. 18 Grandview Road, Chelmsford, 
Massachusetts. Song Leader 1, 2; Junior Welcome 3; Anne Strong 
2. 3, 4. 

TOBY BUCHHALTER WINTRUB, 135 Washington Street, Brighton, 
Massachusetts. Transfer from Ohio State 3 : Prince Club 3, 4. 
BARBARA GAY WITMONDT, 906 River Road, Teaneck. New Jersey. 
Hillel 1 ; Prince Club 2, 3, 4 ; Food Committee 3 ; Spring Spree 3 ; 
Sophomore Prom 2. 

JUDITH ANNE WOLPER. 56 Cook Avenue, Chelsea. Massachusetts. 
Sock and Buskin 1, 2 ; Le Cercle Francais 1 ; Forum 2 : Hillel 2, Presi- 
dent 3 : IRCC 3. 

ELAINE LOUISE WOODMAN, 24 Kenwood Street. Portland, Maine. 
Anne Strong 2. Secretary 3, 4 : Junior Prom 3 : Spring Spree 1. 
MARCIA BATES WORCESTER, 205 Putnam Street, Waltham. Massa- 
chusetts. Anne Strong 2, 3, 4 ; Social Relations 3 ; Junior Welcome 3 ; 
Sock and Buskin 1. 

VIRGINIA FIFE WRIGHT, 33 Larchmont Avenue, Wahan. Massachu- 
setts. Stu-G 1. 2, President 4 ; Executive Board 1, 2, 3 : Officers' Day 
Chairman 1 ; Christmas Cotillion Chairman 2 ; Leaders' Workshop 2, 
Chairman 3 ; NSA Executive Board 3 ; Junior Welcome Chairman 3 ; 
Representative to Faculty Committee on Orientation and Guidance 3, 
Students and Studpnt Affairs 4. 

ANNA LOUISE WURZBACHER, 14 Cornish Street, Lawrence, Massa- 
chusetts. Graduate Nurses' Club President 3, 4. 

Y 
ELECTRA YANKOPOULOS, 147 Lafayette Street. Fall River, Massa- 
chusetts. Orthodox Club 1, 2, President 3, 4 : Ellen Richards 2, 3, ISC 
Representative 4 ; Modern Dance Club 1 ; Dorm Board Council 2, 4 ; 
House Senior 4. 

MARGARET ALICE YOUNG, 3 Vanderburgh Avenue, Larchmont, 
New York. Home Economics Club 2, 3, 4 ; Representative to Massa- 
chusetts Home Economics College Clubs 3, 4. 

Z 
BARBARA ANN ZONIS, 14 Wilmore Street, Mattapan, Massachusetts. 
Hillel 1, 2, 3. 

JOAN CLAIR ZWEIGBAUM, 185 Osborn Avenue, New Haven, Con- 
necticut. Hillel 1 ; Spring Spree 3 : Skit Night 3 ; House Council 4. 



132 



MICROCOSM BOARD 

Risa Rickman 1 

Janet Shapiro f _ -Co-Editors-in-chief 

Marjorie Melnick Associate Editor 

Nancy Carroll ) 

Louise Harianf Advertising Co-Managers 

Sheila Orlinsky Assistant Advertising Manager 

Sarah Stout Art Editor 

Constance Costiganl 

Mary King [ Associate Art Editors 

Roslyn Mateles J 

Sylvia Chiesa Business Manager 

Elaine Gaysunas Circulation Manager 

Judith Berman Assistant Circulation Manager 

Irma Goldman Executive Secretary 

Ruth Lane Literary Editor 

Penelope Karageorge Assistant Literary Editor 

Judith See Photography Editor 

Judith Davis Assistant Photography Editor 

Barbara August Publicity Chairman 

Helen Jean Addison Technical Editor 



JUNIOR STAFF 



Ann Burack 
Joan Casey 
Jeanne Connelly 
Joan Dexter 
Barbara Glass 
Nancy Herbach 
Yalta Isenberg 
Maxine Kern 



Janice Kline 
Roberta Pliner 
Emily Post 
Deanna Rothschild 
Martha Sartain 
Phyllis Schuman 
Marjorie Slater 
Lilo Stargardter 



SOPHOMORE STAFF 



Jane Drooker 
Patricia Dubiel 
Nancy Greene 
Carole Merkatz 



Elaine Paulson 
Ruth Resh 
Marion Webster 



FACULTY CONSULTANTS 



Mr. Raymond F. Bosworth 
Miss Virginia L. Bratton 
Mrs. Isabella K. Coulter 
Miss Viola G. Engler 
Mr. Dino G. Valz 



133 



HOTEL STATLER 

Boston, Mass. 

Extends Greetings and Good Wishes 
To SIMMONS COLLEGE 
Its Students and Faculty 

Visit Our TERRACE ROOM 
Dining and Dancing 
With Famed Bands 

D. B. Stanbro 
General Manager 



DL HI-DA-WAY 

"Boston's Nicest Eating Place" 

In the heart of the theatre and shopping 
district. 

Exceptional luncheon and dinner menus 
with a wide variety of luscious desserts. 

An ideal spot for group meetings. 

Open daily 1 1 A.M. to 8 P.M. 
Henry J. Meagher, Your Host 
3 Boylston Place, Boston — (Near Colonial Theatre) 



JEWELERS FOR YOUR CLASS RINGS 

DIEGES & CLUST 
Manufacturing Jewelers 

226 Public Street 
Providence, Rhode Island 



Proms, Parties, Teas 

Go Over Big at Boston's Fabulous 

SHERRY BILTMORE 
HOTEL 

Mass. Avenue near Boylston St. 

P.S. Perfect room accommodations for 
your guests 



Compliments of 

ARTHUR ARMOND 

266 Brookline Avenue 
BEacon 2-6236 



TO THE CLASS OF '57 

OUR BEST WISHES 

THE SHERATON PLAZA 

Boston 

H. de F. Nyboe 
General Manager 



Compliments of 

LONGWOOD PHARMACY 

411 Brookline Avenue 
Boston, Massachusetts 



134 



WEAR THE POPULAR 
WRIGHT AND DITSON "SADDLES" 

Smart two-tone style oxfords with leather 
uppers. Plain toe. Rubber soles. The orig- 
inal Saddle shoes that smart girls list as 
a "must have" the year round. 

WRIGHT & DITSON 

462 Boylston St., Boston 16, Mass. 



Famous for 

GOOD FOODS 

DELICACIES 

PERFUMERY 



S. S. PIERCE CO. 

Store at 133 Brookline Avenue 




V %e ^Delmai @omfc<z*ity 



Printers of the 



57 MIG 



44 Winn Street 

Woburn, Massachusetts 

WO 2-1957 



135 



The Warren Kay Vantine Studio, Inc. 



Official Photographers 



for 



THE 1957 MICROCOSM 



132 Boylston St. 
Boston, Mass. 



661 Congress St. 
Portland, Maine 



136 



NOT FOR CIRCULATION